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Full text of "...Mirror : Waltham High School"

WALTHAM PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 4867 00650 2373 



W(>e jWtrror 

1035 [ 




Wal. Ref- 
EDUCATION 

1935 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners 



http://archive.org/details/mirrorwalthamhig1935walt 



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Compliments of 

Embassy Theatre 

Wm. Hartnett, Mgr. 

Matinee 2 P. M. 

Evenings 8 P. M. 



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SEND FOR PIN or TROPHY, CATALOG 




"<>-^»<>-<^»-!'^B»- "«■»-< >*■»■'>•* 



Waltham Trade School Printing Shop 



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C. F. CASHMAN 

Bicycles and Supplies — Tires, Tubes and Accessories — 
Lawn Mowers and Skates Sharpened — Tennis Rackets 
Restrung — Carriage and Tricycle Tires Put On 



462 MOODY STREET 



WALTHAM 



!*— 



*i 



HARRY A. STARR 
FUEL CO. 

"Serves You Right" 

Office, 420 Moody Street, Waltham, Mass. 
Telephone Waltham 0884 



Compliments of 

GEORGE E. OLSON 

MEN'S SHOP 

377 MOODY STREET 
WALTHAM MASS. 



I *>■. 



WALTHAM COAL CO. 

"THE BEST IS THE CHEAPEST" 

This applies to coal just the same as to all kinds of 

Merchandise. We handle only the best grades. 

CLEAN COAL PROMPT DELIVERY 



Tel. 0166 



MAIN STREET 



■*{ 



CARTERS DRUG STORE 

"Every Inch a Drug Store" 
PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY 



842 MOODY STREET 



WALTHAM, MASS. 



V, 



Compliments of 



W. H. Nichols 



44 Woerd Ayenue 



Stop! Stop! 

DOWNYFLAKE DOUGHNUTS 

AT 

The Karmelkorn Shop 

463 Moody Street, Waltham 

The ONLY Authorized Dealer 



J. J. MURRAY 

OPTOMETRIST 

Mercantile Building, Rooms 6 and 7, Waltham, Mass. 
Tel. Waltham 1128-M 



i 






I 

( 

i 
i 

I 
I In the Long Run- I 

! ! 

! j 

you and your friends will 

\ prize the portrait that looks j 

like you — your truest self, f 

5 | 

| free from stage effects and 

J little conceits. \ 

I j 

| It is in this "long run" pho- ( 

I tography that PURDY suc- 

I I 

j cess has been won. j 

Portraiture by the camera 
f that one cannot laugh at or j 

cry over in later years. "% 

For the present pleasure and 
! * 

j future pride protect your 

photographic self by having 

PUEDY make the portraits. j 

i 

i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 
i 

160 TEEMONT STREET BOSTON I 



i 
I 

i 
i 

I PURDY 

i 
\ 

i Official protographer, Waltham High School 

| Class of" 19^5" 

i 

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W$t JfWirror 



1935 



Waltham High School 

Class Poem 

Arthur N. Burke, Principal 

Class Statistics 

Class History 

Last Will and Testament 

Class Motto 

Who's Who 

Tercentenary Thoughts 

Class Prophecy 



Barbara Risdon 



Pris cilia Davis 
Richard Blake 
Richard Blake 



Dagmar Bistrup 
Franklin Davis 



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♦;♦'• 
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NORTHEASTERN 
UNIVERSITY 



DAY DIVISION 

SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Offers a broad program of college subjects including selected occu- 
pational courses, tbe purpose of which is to give the student a liberal 
and cultural education and a vocational competence which fits him to 
enter some specific type of useful employment. 

SCHOOL OF' BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Offers a college program with broad and thorough training in the 
principles of business with specialization in ACCOUNTING, BANKING 
AND FINANCE, or BUSINESS MANAGEMENT. Instruction is through 
lectures, solution of business problems, class discussions, motion pic- 

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

Provides complete college programs in Engineering with profes- 
sional courses in the fields of CIVIL, MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL, 
CHEMICAL, and INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING. Students select, at 
the beginning of the Sophomore year, the course in which they intend 
to specialize. 

Co-operative Plan 

The Co-operative Plan provides for a combination of practical in- 
dustrial experience with classroom instruction. The student earns a 
portion of his school expenses and forms business contacts which prove 
valuable in later years. 

Degrees Awarded 

The Bachelor of Science Degree is conferred upon all students who 
satisfactorily complete an approved course of study. 

EVENING DIVISION 

(For Men and Women) 
Providing complete courses of university grade in business and law, for 
high school graduates who find it necessary to ivork during 
the day but wish to study for further advancement 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

Specializes in accounting and 
business administration under in- 
structors actually engaged in the 
business that they teach. 

73% of graduates hold major 
executive positions in business. 
Outstandingly successful in C. P. 

A. examinations. School grants B. 

B. A. and M. B. A. degrees. Indi- 
vidual courses also available to 
special students. 



SCHOOL OF LAW 

Four-year course. LL. B. degree. 

Graduates of this school eligible 
for the Bar Examination. 

Case method of instruction sim- 
ilar to that in best day law schools. 

A School of high standards 
adapted to the needs of employed 
men and women. Alumni out- 
standingly successful as lawyers, 
judges, business executives. 



Graduates of Waltham High School may be admitted without examinations 
if grades are satisfactory to the Department of Admissions. 

Catalogs or further information sent upon request 

NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



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THE MIRROR, 1935 1 



VOL. XXVI 



Waltham, Mass., Graduation Number, 1934-1935 



*=to ijolb, ag ttoere tfje mirror up to nature' 

Hamlet, Act III, Sc. ii. 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

Richard Blake 



Editorial Staff 



BUSINESS MANAGER 

Paul Butman 



No. 3 



ASS'T. EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
John Eaton 



ADVERTISING MANAGER 

Barbara Risdon 



ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 
Robert Cutting Fredrick Isakson 



ASS'T. ADVERTISING MANAGERS 
Albert Hansen Blanche McKenney 



EXCHANGE EDITOR 

Dorothy Barrett 



ALUMNI EDITOR 

Dagmar Bistrup 



MUSIC EDITOR 

Rudolph Helgeson 



ART EDITOR 

William Pearson 



Agnes Rolin {Girls) 



SPORT EDITORS 



John Elder, (Boys) 



JOKE EDITOR 

Adelyn Fish 



ASS'T. JOKE EDITORS 
Edward McCabe Lucile Healey 



STAFF SECRETARY 
Barbara Bennett 



LITERARY EDITORS 



Shirley Norman 
June Tinglof 
Sarah Smith 
Betty Wyman 
Esther Mehring 
George Harris 
Franklin Davis 



Harold Pope 

Carleton Hastings 
Ptolemy Adams 
Robert Power 
Woodrow Cataldo 
Elizabeth Castner 



Literary Department 
Business Department 
Art Department 



FACULTY ADVISERS 



Miss Ober 
Miss Callanan 
Miss Burgess 






'')4»n«»<>«ra' "4F>i'-«»()-<R»<>4 



OTOOLE THE FLORIST 

At the Sign of the Clock 

719 MAIN STREET WALTHAM 

Telephone Waltham 2961 

Perennial Gardens — North Avenue, Weston 

3 Miles West of Waltham, Route 117 



j .„_ 



New and Used Office 


and Portable 


* 


TYPEWRITERS 




SOLD, RENTED REPAIRED 

Student Rental Rate $1.00 a week 
$3.00 .... 1 month buys a new 


UPSTAIRS CLOTHIERS 

! COLLINS & ROONEY 


$7.50 _ 3 months 


Royal Corona 


| (Over Liggetts) 




Underwood 


267 Moody Street 




Remington 


I Special Sport Coats and White 




or Noiseless 


Flannel Trousers 




Typewriter 




Typewriter Service Shop 





INSURE INSURE INSURANCE 

For Action See 

WOODWARD & TYLER 

844 MAIN STREET WALTHAM 



L 



THE MIEROK, 19 3 5 




WALTHAM SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



CLASS POEM 



We graduates are going forth — 

God bless us every one! 
To run this hard and stubborn world 

just as it should be run; 
But much I fear we'll find that facts 

Don't always track with dreams; 
For running this old world is not 

As easy as it seems. 

With schooldays done and work begun, 

We learn to our regret 
The college of experience 

We have not mastered yet. 
Life is a battle where each one 

Must seek and hold his own. 
He who would rise above the clouds 

Must scale the heights alone. 

This is the rule of life to-day, 

As it has ever been; 
The world bestows its smiles on those 

Who have the strength to win. 
Beneath all outward semblances 

It looks for merit true. 
It little cares how much you know, 

But asks what can you do? 

Barbara Risdon. 



THE MIRROR, 1935 




ARTHUR N. BURKE, Principal 



THE MIRROR, 1935 



FLORENCE ACKLES 

"Blondie" 
Nevah! I think so too. (a) 
Havin' a good time, Reading, 

Ridin' in open cars (b) 
Unknown (c) 
To see Paree (d) 
Orchestra, 2, 3; Honor Roll, 3; 

Dramatic Club (e) 



RALPH J. ALVAREZ 
"Al" 

Okay (a) 

Railroading and Camping, Fish- 
ing (b) 

The roundhouse (c) 

Locomotive Engineer or Fireman 
(d) 



ROSE HELEN ANNUNCIATA 

"Red" 
Don't Bother me and Skip it (a) 
Talking in Study Periods and to 

argue with Mr. Hodge (b) 
To ride to Africa on a mule (c) 
To marry Dick Powell (d) 
Com. Club, Baseball, Volley Ball, 

Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



GERALDINE BACON 

"Gerry" 
I don't know (a) 
Baseball and Reading Mystery 

Stories (b) 
Grand Canyon and wide open 

spaces (c) 
To travel (d) 
1934 Class Team, Voley Ball, 

Baseball, Hockey, Basketball, 

Bowling, Baseball. 3; Com. 

Club, Honor Roll, 3 (e) 



MABEL ELEANOR BARNES 

"May" 
I wouldn't know (b) 
Knitting at present, collecting 

sugar, walking (b) 
Miss Wheelock's School (c) 
To have a Kindergarten of my 

own (d) 
Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Christmas 

Carols, 1, 2 (e) 




PTOLEMY A. ADAMS 

"Tom," "Tommy" 
Hey Bud (a) 

Hunting, Fishing, Skiing, Danc- 
ing (b) 
Some College to learn (c) 
To be a Conservation Expert (d) 
Track 3 ; Class Pres. ; Jr. Prom., 
2; Sen. Dance; Picture Com.; 
Football; Dramatic Club 3 (e) 



ROLAND W. ANDERSON 
"Roily" 

What's up (a) 

Athletics (b) 

To go to China (c) 

Street Cleaner (d) 

Football, Baseball and Basket- 
ball, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



SANTINO J. BOCCABELLO 

"Bucky" 

Fm laffing at you (a) 

Day dreaming (b) 

The world at large (c) 

Public Tramp No. 1 (d) 

Night Roaming; Expert Sales- 
manship (e) 



WILLIAM GORDON BAIN 

"Fish" 
So what (a) 
Fishing, Baseball (b) 

B. U. (c) 

C. P. A. (d) 

Basketball, Baseball, Com. Club 
(e) 



PHILIP JAMES BARRY 

"Phip", "Phil" 
What do you want? (a) 
Walking on top of the dyke (b) 
Paris, France (c) 
Poet (d) 
Football, Baseball, Basketball, 1, 

2, 3 (e) 



Note: {a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



T H E M I R R R , 19 3 5 



RUTH FRANCES BEAIRSTO 

"Blondie" 
What's the stoiy? Take it easy 

(a) 
Len (b) 
Hollywood (c) 
To get married (d) 
Commercial Club (e) 



BARBARA F. BENNETT 

"Biggy", "Barby" 
I haven't the faintest idea (a) 
Sports (b) 

The wide open spaces (c) 
To be a cow girl in Texas (d) 
Honor Roll, 1, 2; Hockey, 2, 3 
Basketball, 3; Varsity, 3 
Bowling, 2, 3; Gym Meet, 1 
Volley Ball, 2; Baseball, 2 
Com. Club, 3 ; Sec. of Mirror 
Staff, 3 (e) 



BESSIE E. BIGNIS 

"Biggy" 

Don't look like that (a) 
Reading detective magazines (b) 
Who knows (c) 
To be Eppy's press agent and 

manager (d) 
Commercial Club (e) 



GEORGE RICHARD BLAKE 
"Di'k", "Blako", "Blakey" 

You Bet! (a) 

S:amp Collecting, Tennis (b) 

M. I. T. (c) 

To be portly and prosperous (d) 

Class Auditor, 1 ; Asst. Editor of 
Mirror, 2 ; Jr. Social Com. 2 ; 
Dramatic Club, 3 ; Editor-in- 
chief of Mirror, 3; Pub. Chair. 
Dramatic Club Play, 3; All 
A's ( 10 quarters) (e) 



FRANK BORDENCA 
"The Whistling Barber" 
You'se Guys (a) 
Women (b) 

Art School — Waverley Naval (c) 
To Draw for Magazine Covers 
(d) 




GEORGE A. BEAMISH 

"Gus", "Bud" 
A rolling car gathers no girls 

(a) 
Rifle and Pistol Shooting (b) 
Water Basin (c) 
To find the day when Green isn't 

bumming cigarettes (d) 
Baseball, 1; Football, 2; Track, 

2; Member Com. Club, 3 (e) 



F. ALEXANDER BERGSTROM 
Collecting stamps, old books (b) 
Harvard University (c) 
To be Ambassador to (he Court 
of St. James (d) 



DAGMAR A. BISTRUP 

Music and Sports (b) 

Radcliffe (c) 

To play my part in harmony (d) 

Orchestra, 2, 3; Honor Roll, 1, 
2, 3; Literary Editor of Mir- 
ror, 1, 2; Alumni Editor of 
Mirror, 3 ; Play Com. 2 ; Dra- 
matic Club Play Candy Com., 
2; Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 3 (e) 

JOAN LYMAN BOGERT 
"Joannie" 

Ra-ther (a) 

Fencing, Swimming (b) 

England (c) 

Child Psychologist (d) 

Home Room and Varsi'.y Basket- 
ball, Class Bowling, Tennis 
Team, 1, 2; Varsity Baseball, 
Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Manager, 3; 
Varsity Volley Ball, 2 ; Tennis 
Capt., 2; Dram. Club, 1, 2, 
3; Christmas Carols, 1, 2, 3; 
Gym Meet, 1 ; Candy Girl, 
Dram. Club Play and Sr. Play, 
3 (e) 

JAMES HAROLD BOWLEY 

"Harry" 
Yow-sah (a) 
Sign Painting (b) 
East Jailoppy (c) 
Sign Painter (d) 
Com. Club Entertainment, 3 ; 

High School Orchestra, 1, 2, 3 

(e) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE IIEROE, 19 3 



MANLEY E. BOYCE 

"Lincoln" "Farmer" 
Oh, Yea! (a) 
Killing skunks (b) 
Unknown (c) 
To kiss the Bearded Lady (d) 

Committee, 3 (e) 



GRACE EVELYN BROWN 

"Brownie" 
Arn't you the one? (a) 
Playing with Ronny (b) 
Wherever Jake sends me (c) 
Not sure I have any (d) 



ELIZABETH BUCKLEY 

"Betty" 
I'll tell him when he comes in 

(a) 
Haunting houses (b) 
I don't know — just hope (c) 
To r;de in a fire engine (d) 



PAUL MILTON BUTMAN 

Hey, Bud! (a) 

Chess, Tennis, Hunting (b) 

M. I. T. (c) 

Aeronautical Engineer (d) 

Class Officer, 1 ; Business Mgr. 
of Mirror, 1, 2, 3; Dram. Club 
Officer, 2, 3; Chairman Sen- 
ior Play, 3; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 
3; Tennis Team, 2, 3 (e) 



JAMES V. CANNISTRARO 

"Jimmie", "K. O." 
Where's the skunk? (a) 
Bumming sandwiches, recess (b) 
Jungle of Borneo with Stone (c) 
To see Curran grad. in '39 (d) 
Band, 1, 2, 3; Track, 2; Basket- 
ball, 1, 2, 3; D. C, 3; S. J. 
H. Alumnae, 1, 2, 3; Honor 
Roll, 1, 2, 3 (e) 




BERTHA M. J. BREAULT 

"Bert", "Berta" 
It's perfect! (a) 
Drawing and Babies (b) 
A cottage in the country (c) 
To be a Commercial Artist (d) 
Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Picture 

Com., 3 (e) 



CHARLES F. BRYSON 

"Charlie" 
How to go (a) 
Sports (b) 
Tufts (c) 

To emulate Halliburton (d> 
Honor Roll, 1, 2; Dram. Club, 3; 

Stage Com. Dram. Club Play, 

3 ; Radio Broadcast with Dram. 

Club, 3 (e) 



ROBERT LEE BUCKLEY 
"Bob", "Buck", "Baucala" 

Anything that doesn't cost much 
(b) 

To N. Y. in the summer (c) 

To be able to pass Physics in- 
stead of always taking one (d) 

Dramatic Club, 2, 3; Ass't. Stage 
Mgr. Dram. Club Play, 2; 
Stage Mgr. Dram. Club Play, 
ec. Com. Dram. Club, 3 ; 5 yrs. 
in Sr. High Band (e) 



CLARA SYLVIA CAIA 

Really! (a) 

P.G. Dancing (b) 

The Golden Gates (c) 

To be a private secretary (d) 

Com. Club, 2, 3 (e) 



MORTON CANTER 

"Morty" 
Some fun, eh ! (a) 
Scoring Big-league Ball-games 

(b) 
Tufts (c) 
To pass a College Board — some 

day (d) 
Band, 1, 2, 3; Dram. Club, 2, 3; 

Cast "In the Next Room," 2; 

Basketball, 2; Honor Roll, 3 

(e) 



Note: {a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, {d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIRROR, 1985 



EVELYN E. CARROLL 

"Evie" 
So, what? (a) 
Laughing (b) 
Bermuda (c) 

To drive a Packard roadster (d) 
Secretary of Com. Club, 3 (e) 



ROBERT JOSEPH CASEY 

"Bob" 
That's some bird (a) 
Breeding and racing homing 

pigeons (b) 
Undecided (c) 

To be a golf professional (d) 
Football usher, Basketball (e) 



MADELINE CHIACCHIO 

"Ellie" 
You're telling me (a) 
Movies (b) 
Heaven (c) 
Private secretary (d) 
Commercial Club (e) 



EDWARD F. CHRISTIE 

"Eddie", "Chris", "Christie" 

You said It. That will be the 
day (a) 

Playing Cards and Sports (b) 

Mayor of Lakeview (Hollywood) 

(c) 
To graduate from Waltham High 

School (d) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4, Baseball, 4 

(e) 

HELEN B. COFFIN 
"Beebe" 

Good for you (a) 

Listening to Amateur Radio 
Broadcasts (b) 

Radio City (c) 

To sing on the radio (d) 

Volley Ball, Class Team, 2; Base 
Ball, Class Team, 2; Hockey 
1 ; Hockey, Class Team, 3 
Bowling, 3; Com. Club, 3 
Baseball, 3 (e) 




ROSE CONSTANCE CASELLA 

"Shrimp" 
You don't say (a) 
Wearing out shoe leather (b) 
Going to heaven on a mule (c) 
To grow a few inches (d) 
Commercial Club (e) 



LESLIE B. CASWELL 

"Les", "Cazy" 
Ya (a) 

Sports, Gardening (b) 
Oregon (c) 
To become a business executive 

(d) 
Orchestra, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



HARRIET CHILDS 

"Happy" 
Stay with me; I want to be alone 

(a) 
Dreaming (b) 
Chicago (c) 

To soar with Wiley Post (d) 
Capt. Class Basketball team, 1 ; 

Dram. Club, 1 ; Chmn. of 

Dram. Club Play Com. 2 ; Jr. 

Nom. Com., 2 ; Chmn. Exec. 

Com. Dram. Club, 2 ; Sr. Play 

Cast, 3; Honor Roll, 2, 3 (e) 

VIRGINIA ELIZABETH COBB 

"Jinney", "Cobie," "Chookie" 
Hi ole stockin', how's your feet? 

(a) 
Studying Astronomy and Reading 

poetry (b) 
University of Hard Knocks (c) 
To marry a Commercial artist? 

(d) 
Attending twelve years of school, 

Archery, 3; Baseball, 1 (e) 

HENRY R. B. COLLINS 

"Hank", "Henny" 
I'm surprised (a) 
Riding the bumpy roads of Lin- 
coln (b) 
A southern college (c) 
To pay "Doc" two dollars (d) 
Football, Baseball, Hockey, 1, 2, 
3 ; Jr. Prom. Com., 2 ; Sr. 
Dance Com., 3; Sr. Play Com., 
3 ; Picture Com. 3 ; Treasurer, 
1; Class Day Com., 3 (e) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE IIBKOR, 1935 



JOHN JOSEPH COLLINS 

"Shono" 
So what! (a) 
Pool (b) 
Waverly (c) 

To become a safe cracker (d) 
Commercial Club, 3 (e) 



DANIEL STEELE CORCORAN 

"Dan" 
Dad durn it! (a) 
Borrowing money and doing cross 

words (b) 
Over the hill (c) 
Garbage practicioner (d) 



CHARLES H. COX 

"Chazley", "Cueball" 
What choo say? (a) 
Toe dancing, yacht racing (b) 
Boston University C. B. A. (c) 
To build a real High School in 

Waltham (d) 
Football, 1, 2; Basketball, 1, 2, 3 

(e) 



FLORENCE CREVOSHAY 

"Crevie" 
As long as we're healthy (a) 
Collecting anything for nothing 

(b) 
Where all good people go (c) 
To know Clark Gable as he 

really is (d) 
Dramatic Club, 3, 4 (e) 



FRANCIS H. CUNNARE 

"Chip", "Chippy" "Chippie" 

Oh! you little rascal you (a) 

Stamp collecting, Baseball, Golf, 
and Hockey (b) 

Columbia (c) 

Electrical Engineer (d) 

Student Mgr. Football, 3 ; Base- 
ball, 1; Basketball, 1, 2 (e) 




GERTRUDE CONNEARNEY 

"Gert", "Hon" 
So what (a) 
Music, Sewing (b) 
To be N. B. Ceeing you (c) 
Radio (d) 
Commercial Club (e) 



MURIEL H. COTA 

"Bub- 
Fiddlesticks (a) 
Collecting dog pictures and 

Stories (b) 
Business College (c) 
To put my best into life that I 
may receive the best from life 
(d) 
Bowling, Tennis, Archery, Bas- 
ketball, Com. Club, (e) 

OLIVE VIRGINIA COX 

So what. I dunno (a) 

Feeding the pigeons on Boston 
Common (b) 

Far, far away (c) 

To have a little Indian (like 
John Brown's) (d) 

Com. Club, Assembly Com., 
Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Tennis, 1; 
Bowling, 1, 2; Basketball, 
Mgr. Basketball, Hockey Capt, 
1,2,3; Volley Ball, 1; Basket- 
ball Varsity, 1 (e) 

CATHERINE M. CRONIN 
"Cathy", "Caddie" 

I knew it (a) 

Peddling smelts (b) 

Where spinach grows (c) 

To be Popeye's wife (d) 

Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Bowling, 1, 
2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Hockey, 
1, 2, 3; Volley Ball, 2; Gym 
Meet, 1 ; Com. Club, 3 ; Ten- 
nis, 2 (e) 



ELEANOR M. CUNNIFFE 

"Na" 
What do you think? (a) 
Dancing, reading (b) 
Who can tell! (c) 
To travel (d) 



Note: {a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIRROR, 1935 



RICHARD L. DALEY 
"Doc," "Dick" 

Sluier Kruel ? (a) 

Waiting for Collins or Schwot- 
zer's two bucks (b) 

African Jungle (c) 

To be Shirley Temple's Leading 
man (d) 

Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 2, 
3; Cheer Leader, 2, 3; Foot- 
ball, 1, 3; Dram. Club, 3 (e) 



DOROTHY SARAH DAVIS 
"Dotty" 

Don't bother me (a) 

Walking (b) 

The sky's the limit (c) 

To climb to the heights of suc- 
cess in ? (d) 

Com. Club, Basketball, Volley 
Ball, Archery, Tennis, Bowl- 
ing (e) 



PRISCILLA DAVIS 

"Prilla" 
Do you want to buy a ticket? (a) 
Dancing (b) 
Wellesley College 
To marry a millionaire (d) 
Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Bowling, 1, 

2; Hockey, 2, 3; Tickets Sr. 

Play Com; Sr. Dance Com.; 

Jr. Prom Com. ; Dram. Club, 

1, 2, 3; Class Historian (e) 



CATHERINE V. A. DELFINO 

"Kitty" 
I'll be there if you are! (a) 
Fan Dancing (b) 
Wait till I get there first (c) 
To date up Maxie Baer (d) 
Com. Club, 3 ; Honor Roll, 3 ; 

Baseball, 2, 3; Bowling, 2; 

Basketball, 2 (e) 



WILLIAM F. DOHERTY 

"Bill" 
You bet (a) 
Riding horses (Hobby horses) 

(b) 
Lakeview (Hollywood) (c) 
Jockey (d) 
Football, 2, 3 (e) 




MILDRED J. DALLA COSTA 

"Milly" 
Really (a) 
Music, Tennis (b) 
Lawyer of Supreme Court (c) 
Lawyer (d) 
Commercial Club (e) 



FRANKLIN M. DAVIS, JR. 
"Dynamite" 

As it were (a) 

Any ol' thing (b) 

Mass. State College (c) 

To be a journalist (d) 

Dram. Club, 2, 3; Band, 1, 2 
High School Reporter, 2, 3 
"Mirror" Literary Staff, 2, 3 
Club Play, 2; Sr. Play Com. 
Class Prophet (e) 



VINCENT THOMAS DEFINA 

"The Bomber" 
Say, your all right (a) 
Sports (b) 
To Florida (c) 

To become a Football Coach (d) 
Football, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2, 

3; Basketball, 3 (e) 



MAY MELISSA DEMONT 

"Maizie" 
Who knows? (a) 
A good time, Tennis (b) 
Boston University (c) 
To pilot a plane for D. M. G. 

(d) 
Basketball, 2, 3; Hockey, 1, 3; 

Tennis, 1 2, 3; Commercial 

Club, 3 (e) 



FRANCES E. DOORE 

Not really (a) 

Singing (b) 

Opera (c) 

To be a hygienist (d) 



Note: {a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIRROR, 1935 



BERENICE A. DOUCETTE 
"Bunny", "Shrimp" 

Aw go on (a) 

Blonds and redheads and danc- 
ing (b) 

Hollywood (c) 

To sue Clark Gable for breach 
of promise (d) 

Volley Ball, 3; Gym Meet, 2; 
Hockey, 1; Basketball, 1 (e) 



BARBARA J. DWYER 

"Bobby" 
Heck it (a) 
Fishing, Swimming (b) 
Art School (c) 
To be a farmer (d) 
Hockey, Archery (e) 



THOMAS J. EATON 

"Tommy" 
Nuts (a) 
Playing Pool (b) 
Bemis Tech (c) 
To get a job (d) 
Com. Club, 2, 3 (e) 



JOHN ALEXANDER ELDER 

"Star" 
Hurrah! no homework tonight 

(a) 
Track (b) 
Utopia (c) 
To win the B. A. A. marathon 

(d) 

Track, 1, 2, 3; Secretary of 
Dram. Club; Student Member 
Football Team, 3 ; Member of 
Dram. Club Play Cast, 3 ; Ath- 
letic Editor of "Mirror, 3 (e) 

DOROTHY M. ERICKSON 
"Dot" 

Really (a) 

Theatre, Books (b) 

Somewhere (c) 

Professor ( d ) 

Monitor, 1 ; Archery Team, 2 ; 
Dram. Club, 2, 3 ; Candy Girl 
Dram. Club, 3; Candy Girl 
Senior Play, 3; Christmas Car- 
ols, 3; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3 (e) 




J. KLINE DREPPERD 

Jell-o Again (a) 

Keeping records of Big-league 

Baseball (b) 
Expect to study further, School 

undecided (c) 
To be noted Economist (d) 



ROBERT B. EATON 

"Bob" 
A little of everything (b) 
Massachusetts State College (c) 
To be a success in life (d) 
Basketball, 2 ; Football usher, 3 

(e) 



DOROTHY LOIS EIMER 

"Dot" 
Oh, really! (a) 
Riding Roller Coasters (b) 
White House (c) 
To be the President's secretary 

(d) 
Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 

1, 2; Dram. Club, 1, 2 (e) 



ARTHUR RICHARD ELLIS 

"Emma" 
I wouldn't worry about it (a) 
Swimming, Playing the piano (b) 
Still Green street (c) 
Band, 2, 3 (e) 



ANGELO LOUIS FABRIZIO 

"Fab" 
You're right there like the sleeves 

on a vest (a) 
Photography, Collecting Old 

Coins, Golf (b) 
Northeastern University (c) 
Electrical Engineer (d) 
Senior Play Com., 3 ; Basketball, 

1, 2 (e) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIRROR, 1935 



ADELYN SEWALL FISH 

"Addie," "Fish," "Fishie" 
Ever since God made little apples 

(a) 
Piano, Collecting Souvenirs or 

places (b) 
College, we hope (c) 
To be a successful surgeon (d) 
Class Vice-Pres., 2 ; Dram. Club 
Pres., 3; Club, 1, 2, 3; Basket- 
ball, 1, 2 ; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3 ; 
Dram. Club Play, 2, 3; Senior 
Play Com., 3; Orchestra, 2, 3; 
Literary Ed. "Mirror," 1; Asst. 
Joke Ed., 2; Joke Ed., 3 (e) 

JULIETTE A. FLUECKIGER 

"Jerry" 
Gosh! (a) 
Movies, Dancing and Swimming 

(b) 
New York (c) 
To become a secretary (d) 
Tennis, 1 ; Basketball, 1 ; Swim- 
ming, 1 ; Dancing, 1 ; Com- 
mercial Club, 3 (e) 



ROBERT WARREN FRANKS 

"Bob" 
So's your Uncle Susie (a) 
Swimming, Hockey, Loafing (b) 
Wentworth Institute (c) 
She comes about to my shoulder 
Basketball Rm. 5 (e) 



ALPHEUS O. FULTON 

"Alfie" 
Dry up (a) 
Stamp Collecting (b) 
Wide open spaces (c) 
Farming (d) 
Band, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



GUSTAVE J. GEISLER 

"Gus" 

Go bag your head (a) 

Hunting (b) 

Africa (c) 

Shoot an elephant with 3 heads 
and a tail 46 1-4 inches long, 
weighing 4,862 lbs, 34 ozs. 
■(d) 




ROBERT M. FITZGERALD 
"Fitzie" 

Take it easy (a) 

Picking Rice in Lincoln (b) 

Lincoln Prep. School (c) 

To be the leading farmer in Lin- 
coln (d) 

Jr. Prom. Com., Chairman Sr. 
Dance, Football, l, 2, 3, 4; 
Varsity Football, Chmn. Picture 
Com., Dram. Club, Com. Club, 
Com. Club Officer (e) 



WALTER D. FORD 

"Bucky," "Fliver," "Dave" 
Endsies, Nuts (a) 
Fishing (b) 
Lakeview Agricultural College 

(c) 

To become a farmer (d) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



LOUISE FRENCH 

(d) 

"Frenchie ' 
That's what you think! (a) 
Boats and Swimming (b) 
Lasell (c) 
Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 

1 (e) 



MARION JESSIE GARDINER 

"Goldie" 
He's— Okay (a) 

Walking on Top of the Dyke ! ! 

(a) 
To go around the world and 

make my home in Hollywood 

(b) 
To be famous — At what! (c) 
Junior Prom, 2 ; Jr. Social, 2 ; 

Sr. Dance Entertainment Com., 

3; Commercial Club, 3; Honor 

Roll, Basketball, Baseball, and 

Bowling, 1 (e) 



JAMES ST. GERMAINE 



Note: {a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIRROR, 193 5 



SAM GIROLAMO 

"Jerry," "Sam" 
Ask me; I don't know (a) 
Athletics (b) 
United States Marines and far 

away ( c ) 
Go to Southern California (d) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 

2, 3 (e) 



FRANCES F. GORDON 

"Frannie" 
One never knows (a) 
Dancing, Roller Coasters (b) 
Over the top (c) 
To travel (d) 
Commercial Club (e) 



EVELYN L. GRIFF 

"Ev" 
Your guess is as good as mine 

Driving, Dancing (b) 
John Hopkin's University (c) 
Honor Roll, 2 ; Member Dram. 
Club, 3, 4 (e) 



ROBERT S. HAGEN 

"Bob" 
I could eat a lamb (a) 
Golf (b) 

Waverley Navel (c) 
Success (d) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Golf, 



3 (e) 



ARTHUR D. HANSEN 
"Art," "Daniel Boone" 

Jake sent me! (a) 

Swimming, Fishing, Dancing (b) 

West Point (c) 

To pitch for Jack Leary — some 
day (d) 

Senior Play; Football; Basket- 
ball (e) 




HARRIET L. GOODWIN 

"Hat" 
Oh! really! (a) 
Enjoying myself (b) 
University of Maine (c) 
To be a chemist (d) 
Junior Prom Com, 2 ; Chairman 

Executive Com. Dram Club, 3 ; 

Chairman Dram. Club Play 

Com, 3 ; Senior Play Com., 3 ; 

Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Senior 

Dance Com. 3 (e) 



DOROTHY I. GREENWOOD 

"Dot," "Red," "Rusty" 
I can't get over it (a) 
Drawing (b) 
Boston Art School (c) 
To be a Commercial Artist (d) 



EUGENE FRANCIS GRIMES 

"Shenna" 
I don't know (a) 
Swimming (b) 
To go away to the Jungles of 

Africa (c) 
To play for Sing Sing's Ping 

Pong Team (d) 
Track, 3 (e) 



VIRGINIA ALICE HAGUE 

"Gin," "Ginny" 
Never! Aren't you the one! (a) 
Dancing and Collecting Souvenirs 

(b) 
Business College (c) 
To marry that millionaire (d) 
Monitor, 2 ; Nominating Com., 

2; Dram. Club, 3, 4; Sr. Play, 

Commercial Club, 3 ; Bowling, 

3 (e) 



DORIS A. HARRINGTON 

"Dot" 
How ducky (a) 
Theaters (b) 
Heaven (c) 
To be a success (d) 
Dram. Club, Commercial Club 

(e) 



Note: {a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE 3IIEB0E, 1935 



CARLTON H. HASTINGS 
"Stings" 

Hey, son (a) 

Hunting, Fishing, Taxidermy, 
Music (b) 

Tufts College (c) 

Chemical Engineer (d) 

Band, 1, 2; "Mirror" 2, 3; Ten- 
nis, 3 ; Sr. Play Com., 3 ; 
Dram. Club, 3 ; Honor Roll, 
1, 2, 3 (e) 



RUTH LYDIA HATHORNE 

"Ruthie" 
Oh, my asthma (a) 
Fainting Chinamen (b) 
Farmington Normal School (c) 
To be a designer (d) 
Honor Roll (e) 



ETHEL LOIS HILL 
For cat's sakes (a) 
Collecting pennies (b) 
Frince Edward Island (c) 
To have my own orchestra (d) 
Orchestra, 2, 3 ; Monitor, 1 
Dramatic Club, 2, 3 (e) 



CHARLES S. HIRTLE 

"Chick- 
Go and get it (a) 
Golf (b) 

Waverley Naval Business Col- 
lege (c) 
To get a hole in one (d) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Commercial 
Club (e) 



LOUISE M. HUNTLEY 
"Chick," "Babe" 

111 say! (a) 
Chewin' (b) 
Out West (where men are men) 

(c) 
Volley Ball, 2; Basketball, 1 (e) 




LOUISE HATCH 

"Hatch," Hatchie" 

Herb said (a) 

Collecting pictures for my wa'l 
and Souvenirs (b) 

Europe (c) 

To be a buyer (d) 

Dram. Club, 1, 3; Candy Girl, 1; 
Ex. Com. of Dram. Club, 3 ; 
Prompter at Dram. Club Play, 
3; Christmas Carols, 1, 2, 3; 
Baskeball, Bowling, 1 ; Hockey, 
and Hockey Varsity, 1, 2; Base- 
ball, 1; Football Usher, 1; 
Giver of Gifts, 3 (e) 

RUDOLPH L. HELGESON 

"Rudy," "Helge," "Swede" 
Skip it (a) 

Golf, Music, Football (b) 
Tufts College (c) 
Electrical Engineer (d) 
Band, 1, 2, 3; Orchestra, 1, 



1, 3; Mirror, 



3 ; 

3 ; 



Basketball 
Honor Roll, 1. 2, 3; Dramatic 
Club, 3; Band Musical Come- 
dy, 3 (e) 



THELMA LOUISE HILL 

"Thel" 
That's foul (a) 
Singing (b) 

Bridgewater Normal School (c) 
Take a trip around the wor'd 

(d) 
Honor Roll, 2, 3 (e) 



RUTH DOROTHY HUNT 

"Ruthie" 
Ogee Willya (a) 
Driving a car — going p!a"es (b) 
Somewhere — some time (c) 
To be a miser (d) 
Basketball, 2. 3 ; Commercial 

Club; Baseball, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



MARJORIE ETHEL HURLEY 

"Eppy," "Scotchy" 
Insinuating? Who said that' 

(a) 
Horses and Roller Coasters (b) 
The Theatre (c) 
To become a Comedienne and 

Dancer (d) 
Commercial Club, 3 ; Dramatic 

Club, 2; Hockey, 2 (e) 



Note: {a) Favorite Expression. (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, {d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIRROR, 1935 



RICHARD C. JENSEN 

"Dick" 
Horse feathers (a) 
Looping the links, wrecking cars 

(b) 

Bentley's or Davy Jones (c) 
Dictator of world or anything 

paying over $75.00 (d) 
Commercial Club (e) 



RICHARD C. JONES 

"Red," "Jonesy" 
Fine thing (a) 
Cross-word puzzles (b) 
President of these United States 

(c) 

To be the best in whatever I do 

(d) 
Band, '30, '31, '32, '33, '34, '35; 

Football, 2 ; Commercial Club, 

2, 3 (e) 



PAUL R. KAVANAGH 

"Kav," "Kavie" 
Aw scram (a) 
Swimming at the Y and looping 

the golf links. Basketball (b) 
To go to work (c) 
Get out of high school (d) 

four years (e) 



PHYLLIS MAY KENNEY 

"Phil- 
Reading, Tennis (b) 
Business School (c) 
What's the difference? (a) 
Was a member of the Band for 
Own a black horse named Lad- 
die (d) 
Commercial Club, 3 (e) 



MALLARD KILGORE 

"Mai" 

Forget it (a) 

Piano and Fishing (b) 

Cambridge Theological School 
(c) 

Ministry (d) 

Class Pres., 1 ; Baseball Mgr., 1, 
2, 3; Dram. Club, 2, 3; Cheer 
Leader, 2, 3; Dram. Club 
Play, 3; Senior Play, 3; Treas. 
Dram. Club, 3 (e) 




ETHEL E. JOHNSON 
There'll come a day! (a) 
Trying to keep a diary. Col- 
lecting match folders (b) 
Your guess is as good as mine 

(c) 
To have a secretarial position (d) 
Dram. Club, Commercial Club, 
Membership Com. of Com- 
mercial Club (e) 



STEPHEN J. JUSKIN 
"Jake" 

Nuts to you (a) 

Swimming (b) 

Jungles of Africa (c) 

Soldiers of Fortune (d) 

Football Squad, 1, 2, 3; Basket- 
ball, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



EDNA ANNA KAVALESKI 

"Ed- 
Inspecting Ray-the-on tubes 
What! Who said so? (a) 

(How I can handle them) (b) 
Swing that good old rolling-pin 

(d) 



THERESA MARIE KILBURN 

"Killy" 

Can you imagine! (a) 

The Theatre (b) 

Emerson College of Oratory (c) 

To be the best director on Broad- 
way, and take a Mediterranean 
Cruise (d) 

Teaching dramatics and directing 
plays (e) 



STEPHANIE KROL 

"Stef" 
Really! (a) 
Terking sodas (b) 
Training School for Nurses (c) 
Travel ( d ) 



Note: {a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIRROR, 



193 5 



ROBERT J. LARCOME 

"Bob" 
Das aw wite (a) 
Digging clams (b) 
Hinsdale, Illinois (c) 
To be admiral of the Charles 

River Navy (d) 
Hockey, 1, 2; Track, 1 (e) 



ELIZABETH OLGA LEAF 
Just "Lizzie" 

Don't get excited (a) 

The Why (b) 

Moody Street (c) 

To grow fingernails (d) 

Basketball Class Team, 1, 2, 3; 
Varsity Hockey Class Team, 1, 
2, 3; Varsity, 2, 3; Baseball, 1; 
Honor Roll, 2, 3; Chairman 
Commercial Club Assembly 
Com., Mem. Jr. Prom. Com. 
and Senior Dance (e) 



JAMES M. LEONARD 
"Slug" 

Cut the stuff (a) 

Swimming (b) 

Miami (c) 

To go to war (d) 

Baseball, 2; Waterpolo, 4; Bas- 
ketball, 3, 4 (c) 



JEAN BEVERLY LINCOLN 
"Chicken" 

To say the least (a) 

Tennis (b) 

Art School (c) 

Commercial Artist (d) 

Hockey, 1, 2; Hockey Varsity, 
3 ; Tennis Team, 2 ; Dramatic 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Literary Editor, 
1, 2; Candy girl Dram. Club 
Play, 3 ; Candy girl Sr. Play, 
3; Christmas Carols, 1, 2, 3 
(e) 



WALTER W. LUKE 
Yeah (a) 

Little of everything (b) 
Mass. Nautical School (c) 
Officer (d) 




DONALD S. LAWSON 

"Don" 
Hi, Kid (a) 
Jerking sodas (b) 
Mass. State and eventually Tuft's 

Dental (c) 
To get my barber in the dentist's 

chair (d) 
Track, 1; Band, 1, 2, 3; Dram. 

Club, 2, 3; Sr. Play Com., 

Dram. Club Play Com. (e) 



DOROTHY M. LEISHMAN 
"Dotty," "Dot" 

After all— (a) 

Looking for Billy (b) 

An office (c) 

Clothes Designer (d) 

Mem. Commercial Club Assem- 
bly Com., Sr. Play, Commercial 
Club Hockey, 2, 3; Class and 
Varsity Teams, Basketball, 1, 
2, 3; Basketball, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



TOSEPHINE LOPREST 
Be good now (a) 
Collecting Handkerchiefs (b) 
(Was) to graduate from Wal- 
tham High (d) 



ARTHUR C. LONG 

"Art" 
Nerts! cried the queen (a) 
Books and Books (b) 
Over the river (c) 
To play the Jew's Harp (d) 
Basketball, 3 (e) 



ALMA E. LUNDGREN 

"Al," "Ozzie" 
Skipping gutters (b) 
If I don't, who will? (a) 
Wide open spaces of New Hamp- 
shire (c) 
To raise chickens (d) 
rLockey, 2 ; Basketball, 2 ; Bowl- 
ing, 2, 3; Volley Ball, 3; 
Honor Roll, 2, 3; Commercial 
Club, 3 (e) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIEROR, 1935 



AGNES C. LYON 

"Iggy." "Nan" 
Oh, I'll pop yuh! (a) 
Plain and fancy eating (b) 
Where do you think? (c) 
To be there ! ( d ) 
Dramatic Club, 4 (e) 



ALICE JEAN MAGUIRE 
"Allie" 

All rightie (a) 
Dancing, Playing Piano (b) 
London on a rainy night (c) 
To learn contract (d) 
Commercial Club (e) 



IRENE B. MAURER 

"Rene" 
Some fun ! (a) 
Collecting toys (b) 
You'll know when I get there! 

(c) 
To grow up ! ( d ) 
Dramatic Club, 2, 3 (e) 



GERALD J. McCAUL 

"Gerry," "Mac" 
Forget it (a) 
Sports (b) 
M. I. T. (c) 
Engineering (d) 



CLARE C. McINTYRE 
"Peg-Leg," "Clarabella," 
"Clarey" 

Quiet please! (a) 

Playing hooky from Biology 
Class (b) 

Here and there, mostly there (c) 

To go to Venice and ride in a 
gondola (d) 

Tennis, 3; Volley Ball, 4; Arch- 
ery, 4; Baseball, 4 (e) 




WESLEY H. MacQUEEN 

"Buddy," "Mac" 
Nerts, Life Rolls By (a) 
Swimming (b) 
The River Road? (c) 
To be a success (d) 
Track, 2; Baseball 1 (e) 



HILDA ARLINE MANDELL 

"Tarn" 
Fuh goodness' sake (a) 
Movies (b) 
Advertising (c) 
To sing Mimi in La Boheme (d) 



LAWRENCE T. MAY 

"Curly," "Larry" 
Have it your own way, chappy 

(a) 
Studying people and philosophy 

(b) 
Medical School (c) 
M. D. (d) 
Dram. Club, 1. 2, 3; Band 1, 

2, 3; Football, 2; Basketball, 

2 ; Ass't Stage Mgr. Dram. 

Club Play, 2 ; Cast of Senior 

Play, 3 (e) 



VINCENT JOHN McINNIS 

"Stuffy," "Mac" 
I'd still use two (a) 
Gardening, Swimming, Golf, 

Sports (b) 
Chiseling in the Breadline (c) 
Steady job on the P. W. A. (d) 
Football,2; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; 
Hockey, 3; Baseball, 3; Carols, 

2, 3 (e) 



HENRY DEVLIN McMULLEN 

"Mickey" 
Your the Top. That's a bit of 

All right (a) 
Sports (b) 
St. John's Prep. Boston College 

(c) 
To be a School Teacher (d) 
Track, 1, 2, 3; Hockey, 1, 2, 3; 

Football, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 

1, 2, 3; Tennis Capt., 2, 3; 

Golf, 2, 3 (e) 



Note: {a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (<?) Activities 



THE MIRROR, 1935 



LOUIS J. MEGA 

"Gilbert" 
Awh Nuts (a) 

Collecting champagne bottles (b) 
Conservatory of Music (c) 
A grapefruit crooner (d) 
Dramatic Club (e) 



DONALD K. MILLER 
"Bing," "Don" 

Now? No, not now (a) 

Eating (b) 

Boston University School for 
Business Administration (c) 

Office manager (d) 

Hockey, 2; Baseball, 1; Band, 1, 
2, 3 ; Commercial Club, 3 ; Bas- 
ketball, 1, 2 (e) 



WILLIAM HENRY MORRIS 

"Curly," "Bill- 
Just a hacker (a) 
Golf, Looping, Sports (b) 
Quien Sabe (c) 

To get an "A" in Astronomy (d) 
Football, 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 2, 

3; Manager Baseball, 2, 3 (e) 



EDWARD O. NAUGHTON 
"Ozzie" 

Printing (b) 
Orchestra World (c) 
Pianist (d) 



DORIS E. NEEDHAM 

"Dorian" 
Don't bother me (a) 
Collecting snapshots (b) 
California here I come (c) 
Travel (d) 
Bowling, Commercial Club, 

chestra (e) 



Or 




JUNE D. MELANSON 

"Junie," "Toots" 
So what! (a) 
Reading (b) 
Isle of Capri (c) 
To travel ( d ) 
Dramatic Club, 2, 3; Volley Ball, 

3 (e) 



WILLIAM FRANCIS MORRIS 

"Bill- 
Some day (a) 
Playing Basketball and fixing 

automobiles (b) 
Work (c) 
To be a Commercial Radio 

Operator (d) 
Band, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



SHIRLEY MAE MOULTON 

"Shirl," "Sealy" 
Don't be childish! (a) 
Writing, Walking (b) 
B. U. Law School (c) 
To have a law office in New 

York! (d) 
Dramatic Club; Mirror Agt. (e) 



WILLIAM A NAY 

"Red" 
You said it (a) 
Anywhere (c) 
Musician (d) 
Inactive (e) 



GERTRUDE SONIA NELSON 
"Gert," "Trude" 

Go way wid cha (a) 

Dancing, Dramatics (b) 

Dramatic School (c) 

To be a success (d) 

Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 3; Chairman 
Candy Girls in Jr. yr. for 
Dram. Club Play; Senior Play 
Cast, 3; Dram. Club Play, 3; 
Dram. Club Play Trysting 
Place, 2; Christmas Carols, 1, 
2, 3 (e) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIRROR, 1985 



MARION E. NICKERSON 

"Nick," "Manny" 

Ho'Kay (a) 

Walking (b) 

All poin;s West (c) 

To see the world (not through 
a port hole) (d) 

Basketball, Class Team Varsity, 
2, 3; Bowling, 2, 3; Tennis, 2, 
3 ; Cheer Leader, 3 ; Commer- 
cial Club, 3 ; Prom. Com., 2 ; 
Dance Com., 3; Class Secre- 
tary, and Treasurer, 2, 3 (e) 
Commercial Club Reporter, 3 ; 
Archery, 3 ; Tennis 3 ; Honor 
Roll, 1, 2, 3 (e) 

CARL WILLIAM NYMAN 

"Swede," "Bill" 
K. O. (a) 
Sports (b) 
Northwestern (c) 
Reporter (d) 
Football, 2, 3; Basketball, 2, 3; 

Honor Roll, 3 (e) 



ELIZABETH M. OHNEMUS 
"Betty," "Fish" 

Don't be silly. Is it really? (a) 

Looking for a job (b) 

Home (c) 

To be chief operator in Tele- 
phone Co. (d) 

Commercial Club (e) 



ELINOR K. OLSON 
"Leo," "El" 

Or somethin' (a) 

Collecting toy animals (b) 

Simmons (c) 

To be a success (d) 

Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Bowling, 1, 
2, 3; Class Team, 1, 3; Var- 
sity, 3; Dram. Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Gym Meet, 1 ; Sr. Play Com., 
3; Candy girl Dram. Club 
Play, 2, 3; Christmas Carols, 
2, 3 ; Chmn. Candy Com. Sr. 
Play, 3; Baseball, 3 (e) 



RUTH E. ORPIN 

"Skippy," "Rufus" 
Sissy, Pest (a) 
Dodging Skeesix (b) 
Beth Israel Hospital (c) 
To be a nurse (d) 
Hockey, 2, 3; Baseball, 2 (e) 




HELEN A. NYMAN 

"Hellie" 
Gee, Joe, you're dumb (a) 
"Watching Ginnie dive (I mean, 

try to) (b) 
Lawrenceville (c) 
To drive a plane of my own; 

meet Gene Raymond (d) 
Basketball, 3 ; Class Team, 3 

Sr. Play Com. Prompter, 3 

Bowling, 3 ; Dram. Club, 3 



NORMAN W. O'CLAIR 

"Norm" 
So what ? ( a ) 
Tennis (b) 
Hotel work (c) 
Photography (d) 



DORIS M. OLSON 

"Dot" 
Fancy that (a) 

Drawing, Music (b) 
Art School (c) 
Designing clothes (d) 
Dramatic Club, Orchestra (e) 



GEORGE STANLEY ORPIN 

"Sissy," "Fairy" 
Tooter on the tooter Tommy (a) 
Sports (b) 

Post Graduate Course (c) 
Drive the family buggy (d) 
Mgr. of Football, 2, 3; Mgr. of 

Track, 2, 3; Asst. Mgr. of 

Hockey, 3 (e) 



MARY JUSTINE OWENS 
"Moldy Mag" 

Don' be frash! ! ! (a) 

Behaving like a lady (b) 

Number please! (c) 

To live long enough to see Bar- 
bara in the movies (d) 

Monitor, 2; Basketball 2, 3; Pic- 
ture Com., 4; (e) 



Note: {a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIRROR, 1935 



ROBERT PAGE 

"Bob" 
You're telling me (a) 
Going out nights (b) 
Hollywood (c) 
Have a million dollars (d) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



AUGUSTINE R. PALUMBO 

"Augie" 
What's up (a) 
Basketball, Camping in Freetown 

(b) 
Hebron Academy (c) 
None (d) 

Football, Basketball, Jr. Prom, 

2 ; Sr. Dance, 3 ; Tennis, i ; 

Hockey, 2; Basketball, 1 (e) 



CHARLOTTE E. PARKINSON 

"Cookie," "Lottie" 
Who'd a thunk it? (a) 
Biting my fingernails (b) 
Any where, any place, any time 

(c) 
To be a professional dancer (d) 
Commercial Club (e) 



WILLIAM ALBERT PEARSON 

"Willie," "Jockey" 
Riding (b) 
Any where (c) 
Nerts, to you my, fran' (a) 
To be a thousand miles from 

Waltham (d) 
Art Ed. of Mirror, (e) 



BERNICE S. PETERSON 

"Bunny" 
Oh, dear; Woe is me (a) 
Driving, Tennis, Swimming (b) 
California (c) 

To have a car of my own (d) 
Bowling, 1, 3; Dramatic Club, 

Tennis, 3; Archery, 3; Honor 

Roll, 1(e) 




RINALDO A. PALADINO 

"Pal" 
Oh, come, come (a) 
Airplane Models (b) 
Shoe Repairing Store (c) 
Aviation (d) 
Track (e) 



VERSIE LEE PARKER 

"Verse," "Stanza" 
Do you know what? (a) 
Looking for Ethel at recess (b) 
Cleveland and California (c) 
To model clothes (d) 
Commercial Club, 3; Honor Roll, 

3 (e) 



MARION EVELYN PATTEN 

"Pat" 
Skip it (a) 
Eating Peanuts (b) 
Oregon (c) 

To be a journalist (d) 
Commercial Club, Social Service 

Committee (e) 



CLIFFORD N. PEDERSEN 

"Cliff," "Pete" 
Wickedly (a) 
Fighting Fires (b) 
B. U. (Bums Union) (c) 
To be a singer (d) 
Com. Club, 3; Hockey, 1 (e) 



SUMNER W. PETERSON 
"Pete," "Slugger," "Ace" 

Music, Collecting old coins (b) 

Dartmouth (c) 

To be the leader of a good or- 
chestra (d) 

Band, 1, 2, 3; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; 
Dram. Club, 2, 3 ; Dram. Club 
Play, 3; Senior Play, 3 (e) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (r) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIRROR, 19 3 5 



JOHN JOSEPH PHELAN 

"Sousa" 
Now will you do it again (a) 
Music and Fishing (b) 
Metropolitan Opera House (c) 
Conduct the Boston Symphony 

Orchestra (d) 
Played with school band and or- 
chestra, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



BESSIE PIKE 

"Betty," "Bet," "Betts" 
Heaven's sakes (a) 
Reading, Drawing (b) 
White house with green blinds 

(c) 
To see A. Ringrose get all A's 

(d) 
Honor Roll (e) 



VIRGINIA LOUISE POPE 

"Ginny" 
Hot diggety! (a) 
Doing some thing different (b) 
Switzerland (c) 
Travel extensively (d) 
Commercial Club, 3 (e) 



SAMUEL RUSSELL POWERS 
"Red," Russ" 

Who cares? O. K. (a) 

Music (b) 

? ? ? (c) 

To become successful in the bus- 
iness world (d) 

Band, 1, 2, 3; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; 
Commercial Club, 3 ; Lunch 
Counter Cashier, 3 (e) 



ETHEL ROSE RASMUSSON 

"Toots" 
How's your feet? (a) 
Skating, Swimming (b) 
Supt. of a Hospital (c) 
To be Mr. Hodge's wife (d) 




EDITH E. PIERCE 

"Edie," "Shrimp" 

Aw go on (a) 

Arguing with F. P. (b) 

Burlington, Vermont (c) 

To be a nurse or perhaps a doc- 
tor (d) 

Dram. Club, 2, 3; Basketball, 1; 
Volley Ball, 3 ; Class Team 
Volley Ball (e) 



HAROLD STANTON POPE 
"Popey" 

What do you think? (a) 

Swimming, Skiing (b) 

Here, there, and everywhere (c) 

To be an aeronautical Engineer 
(d) 

Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Mirror Staff, 
2, 3; Dram. Club Play Public- 
ity Mgr, 3; Grad. Speaker, 3; 
Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



JOHN J. POWERS 

"Doggy" 
Aw for Pete sake (a) 
Horse racing (b) 
Waverly Naval (c) 
To own a stable of race horses 

(d) 
Inactive (e) 



FRANCIS JOHN QULNN 

"Quinnee" 
In your hat (a) 
Playing Baseball (b) 
South Dakota (c) 
Multi-millionaire (d) 
Baseball, Studying, and Hanging 

around, Baseball, 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Member Commercial Club (e) 



RITA MARY RASMUSSON 
You don't mean it (a) 
Vinny, Filling a hope chest (b) 
A little cottage in the country 

(c) 
To get married (d) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIRROR, 19 3 5 



NATALIE M. REED 

"Nat" 
I don' know (a) 
Dancing, Reading, Going places 

and doing things (b) 
Unknown (c) 
To travel ( d ) 
Honor Roll, 8 times; Dramatic 

Club, 3; Archery, 3 (e) 



JOHANNE J. RISTUCCIA 

"Jo" 
You know (a) 

Singing, trying to keep thin! (b) 
Kalamazoo! ! (c) 
Private Secretary (d) 
Dramatic Club, Commercial Club, 

Tennis (e) 



PEARL RUBY ROBINSON 
You kute kid (a) 
Do'ng whot I please (b) 
I wonder (c) 
To be a millionaire (d) 



THOMAS F. ROONEY 

"Max," "Tommy" 
What do you think? (a) 
Golf (b) 
Anywhere (c) 
To sell shoe lacings for slippers 

(d) 
Always inactive (e) 



CHARLES L. SANDERSON 

"Chuck" 
Amen ( a ) 
Homework (b) 
Who can tell? (c) 
To be in Who's Who? (d) 




BARBARA JANE RISDON 
"Bobby" 

O. K. Toots! (a) 

Dancing, and collecting menus, 
spoons, etc. (b) 

Emerson College and success (c) 

To be in the movies or on the 
stage (d) 

Asst. Adv. Mgr., 2 ; Adv. Mgr. 
Mirror, 3; Social Com., 1, 2; 
Track Meet, I ; Prom. Com., 
2; Sr. Dance Com., 3; Cast of 
"Rear Car", "The Next Room", 
1,2; Coach of Dram. Club 
Radio Broadcast, 3; Class Poet, 
3; Dram. Club, 1, 2, 3; Class 
Baseball Team, 2, 3 ; Hockey 
Team, 1, 2, 3; Room Basketball 
Team, 2; Dram. Club one-act 
Play, 3 (e) 

W. HARVEY ROBERTS, JR. 

Don't be childish (a) 

Scouting (b) 

Heaven (c) 

Own a Ford (d) 

Senior Play (e) 

AGNES M. ROLIN 

"Muggins," "Agg" 
I dunno (a) 
Sports and Eating (b) 
Where do you think? (c) 
To be the owner of "Candyland" 

(d) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Bowling, 2, 
3; Baseball, 1, 2; Hockey, 2, 
3; Gym Meet, 1; Volley Ball, 
2 ; Archery, 2 ; Sports Ed. of 
"Mirror," 3; Commercial Club. 
3; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



ETHEL M. ROYLE 
"Essie" 

Tain't done in the best of cir- 
cles (a) 

Collecting lump sugar papers 
plus the sugar (b) 

To work (if possible) (c) 

To grow up (d) 

Commercial Club, Dram. Club 
(e) 



LEO SANGELEER 
"Angee" 

Heh Flip (a) 

Florida or Kalamazoo (c) 

Reading Books (b) 

Dig ditches (d) 

Soph. Football, Baseball, 1932, 
Swimming. Hockey, Golf, Bas- 
ketball, Hiking (e) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, («) Activities 



T II E MIREOK, 19 3 5 



MARTHA L. SANGELEER 

"Miggie" 
Gee! that's swell (a) 
Making cakes (b) 
To get a job (d) 
Volley Ball, 4; Archery, 4 (e) 

ERNEST W. SCHWOTZER 
"Ernie," "Ernestine," "Bill" 

Oh for goodness sakes (a) 

My sweet (b) 

St. John's Prep, (c) 

To be a teacher — coach (d) 

Basketball, Football, 1, 2, 3; 
Baseball 2, 3; Capt. Baseball, 
Capt. Baseball, 3; Hockey, 2, 
3; Hockey, 2, 3; Track, 2. 
3; Class auditor, 2; Class Pres., 
3 ; Chmn. Jr. Prom. Com., 2 ; 
Sr. Dance Com., 3; Student 
Rep. to Athletic Com., 3; 
Com. Club, 3 ; Dram. Club, 3 ; 
Pres. Com. Club, 3 ; Honor 
Roll, 2 (e) 



IRENE JOSEPHINE SEGIEN 

"I" 
I m so sorry (a) 
Ridin' in Ford cars (b) 
Mr. Hodge's Rose Garden (c) 
To get a driver's license (d) 
Commercial Club, 3 (e) 



ANNE SHAPIRO 

"Honeysuckle" 
Really (a) 

Making little boys blush (b) 
Northeastern Law School (c) 
To live life (d) 



DORIS VIRGINIA SHAVER 

"Dot" 
Listen (a) 
Driving a car (b) 
Radcliffe College (c) 
To take an aeroplane ride (d) 




HARRIET A. SAWYER 

"Tomy," "Happy" 
It's awfully nice (a) 
Scouting and Athletics (b) 
To visit the western part of U. 

S. — California (c) 
To be successful in my occupa- 
tion (d) 
Band, Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Varsity 
Capt., 3; Basketball, 2; Bowl- 
ing, 3; Baseball, 1,2,3; Tennis 
3; Athletic Com.,1; Archery, 
3; Volley Ball, 3 (e) 



DAVID E. SCOTT 

"Scotty" 
Basketball, Swimming (b) 
Navy (c) 
To retire (d) 



EDMUND SGROI 

"Ed- 
It's the brute in me (a) 
Chasing mosquitoes (b) 
Marathon runner at Alcatraz (c) 
To do it (d) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



PHYLLIS E. SHATTUCK 

"Phil" 
Oh, my cow! (a) 
Doing crossword puzzles (b) 
Somewhere round here (c) 
To think without concentrating 

on it (d) 
Hockey, and Bowling Teams, 2, 

3; Baseball, 2; Basketball, 5 

(e) 



ROBERT G. SHAVER 

"Lefty," "Butch," "Slug' 
That will be the day (a) 
Radio (b) 
Harvard ( c ) 
Radio Operator (d) 



Note: {a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIRBOR, 1935 



BEATRICE RUTH SHEER 

"Bea" 
Your guess is as good as mine 

(a) 
Horseback Riding, Dancing (b) 

Portia Law School (c) 
To own a sport roadster (d) 
Tennis, 1, 3; Baseball, 3; Arch- 
ery (e) 



MARJORIE ANN SHORT 

"Marge" 
Don't be silly (a) 
Collecting Souvenirs (b) 
Wall Street (c) 
To see what's at West Point (d) 
Baseball, 2, 3; Basketball, 2, 3. 

4; Commercial Club (e) 



ELMER C. SMITH 
"Ellie," "Smitty" 
You tell me (a) 
Having a good time (b) 
Stockbridge (c) 
To make good (d) 
Basketball, 2, 3; Track, 3 (e) 



HORACE CLIFFORD SMITH 
"Fat," "Bubbles," "Junior" 

Wait a minute (a) 

Buying S10 suits at Raymonds 
(b) 

Waverley Naval Academy (c) 

Sleep 24 hours a day (d) 

Always inactive (e) 



VERA LOUISE SMITH 

"Lenny" 
Framingham Teachers College 
(c) 
Schoolma'm (d) 




FRED C. SHEFFIELD, JR. 

"Fred," "Sheff," "Muckler" 
Take it easy (a) 
Mechanics, Music (b) 
Everywhere (c) 
Soldier of fortune (d) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Sr. Play; 

Christmas Carols, 3; Baseball, 

1 (e) 



ELIZABETH P. SHRINER 

"Betty" 
No fooling (a) 
Movies, Reading, Dancing (b) 
Paris (c) 

Show producer (d) 
Commercial Club, 3 (e) 



GEORGE H. SMITH 

"Gigi," "Smitty" 
Hi Baby (a) 

Those beautiful dames (b) 
Waverley Naval (c) 
To own a Packard (d) 
Inactive (e) 



SHAW B. SMITH 
"Smitty," "Shie" 
Oh, Toots (a) 
Dog racing (b) 
Waverley Naval (c) 
To own an Airflow (d) 
Inactive (e) 



TONY J. SOGLIERO 

"Tiger," "Slug," "Midnight" 
Taking things apart to find out 

what makes them go (b) 
In zee park in Gay Paree (c) 
Travel around the world (d) 
Football, 1, 3; Basketball, 1, 2, 

3; Track, 2 (e) 



Note: {a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, {d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIRROR, 1935 



WARREN A. SPAULDING 

"Wanny" 
Hello Honey (a) 
Riding horseback and Hunting 

(b) 
University of Maine (c) 
U. S. Forester (d) 
Football, 2; Mgr. Hockey, 1, 2, 

3 (e) 



VIRGINIA E. STEVENS 
"Ginnie" 

Fer goodness sakes (a) 

Most anything (b) 

Washington (c) 

To play an accordion (d) 

Basketball, 2, 3; Archery, 3; Ten- 
nis, 2, 3; Hockey, 2; Cheer 
Leader, 3; Dram. Club, 2, 3; 
Com. Club, 3 (e) 



EDNA C. STROMBERG 

"Eddie" 
Dear me suds (a) 
Outdoor sports (b) 
Norway (c) 

To be a hairdresser (d) 
Volley Ball, Commercial Club, 

Dram. Club, Jr. Nominating 

Com. (e) 



THEODORE W. SUMNER 

"Teddy" 
Take it easy (a) 
Dancing (b) 
Miami, Florida (c) 
Olympic swimmer (d) 
Football 2; Track, 3; Basketball, 

3 (e) 



WILFRED THORP, JR. 

"Willie" 

That's enough from the balcony 
(a) 

Books (b) 

Northeastern (c) 

Engineer, chemical (d) 

Mirror Agt, 2, 3; Dram. Club, 
3; Football Usher, 3; Gradua- 
tion Usher, 1, 2 (e) 




KATHERINE S. STANGBY 

"Kay" 
Oh, Jinks (a) 
Dancing, Singing (b) 
To I he land of the Midnight Sun 

(c) 
To be Bing Crosby's second wife 

(d) 
Commercial Club, Dancing (e) 



KENNETH L. STONE 

"Rocky," "Stony" 
A bit of alright (a) 
Studying the stars at 12:00 P. M. 

(b) 
Far away from where Currans 

grow (c) 
To keep away from work (d) 
Track, Basketball (e) 



ENOCH S. STUDLEY 

"Nick" 
You said it (a) 
Hiking, Fishing (b) 
Arizona (c) 

Aviator, The sky the limit (d) 
Sports (e) 



MARY E. TERRIO 

"Mimi" 
No kidding (a) 
Books (b) 

Katharine Gibbs School 
To travel (d) 
Dramatics, Tennis (e) 



(c) 



FLORA LEONA TIBBETTS 
"Cheese," "Tidbits," "Shrimp" 

So what (a) 

Athletics (b) 

Hospital Training School (c) 

To become a nurse (d) 

Hockey, 3; Bowling, 3; Archery, 
3; Baseball, 3; Basketball, 3 
(e) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, {d) Ambition, {e) Activities 



THE MIRROR, 1935 



FRED R. TORTOLA 

"Freddie" 

Get smart and read a book (a) 

Make hay while the sun shines, 
Moonshine when it rains (b) 

Hawaii or Poland (c) 

Join a Polish army (d) 

Football, 3, 4; Wrestling, Swim- 
ming (e) 



BARBARA ALICE TRACY 
"Babs" 

Aw-Gwan (a) 

Taking photographs (b) 

Any place that's new and differ- 
ent (c) 

To grow the longest eyelashes in 
the world (d) 

Commercial Club (e) 



JOSEPH TROMBLEY 



OSCAR VARRIALE 
"Ozzie" 

O. K.— What say— How ya, kid ? 

(a) 
Swimming, Golf (b) 
Hawaian Islands (c) 
To sell red flannels in Hawaii 

(d) 
Football Mgr in Soph year (e) 



ALBERT A. WADDINGTON 

"Al" 
Fishing (b) 
Bentley's (c) 
Certified Public Accountant (d) 




ROSE M. TORTORELLA 

"Roe" 
I don't know (a) 
Collecting wishbones (b) 
God knows best (c) 
Best dressed woman for one day 

(d) 
Dramatic Club (e) 



ROSALIE TRACY 

"Mae West" 
Za-Zu-Zas Razz Ma-tazz (a) 
Dancing (b) 

To marry a millionaire (c) 
One (partner) of a famous dance 

team (d) 



ALFONSE T VARRIALE 

"Fonsy" 
So what (a) 
Canoeing (b) 
Anywhere (c) 
To be a banker (d) 
Jr. Prom. Com., Sr. Dance Com., 

Sr. Play Com., Dram. Club 

(e) 



ERNEST L. VIENNEAU 

"Ernie," "Pete" 
Is that so? (a) 

Thinking of Ginger Rogers (b) 
Bentley's eventually (c) 
To be a C. P. A. (d) 
Basketball, 2, 3 (e) 



ARTHUR WALSH 

"Art," "Red," "Bud" 
Happy New Year (a) 
Gambling but not for money (b) 
To be an Engineer and construct 

a building like W. H. S. (c) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIRBOR, 1935 



JAMES DAVID WALSH 

None 

Who wants to know? (a) 

None (b) 

Unknown (c) 

Run for some Western College 
Track Team (d) 

Track, 2, 3, 4; Capt. in 4; Base- 
ball, 3, 4 (e) 



EDWIN H. WASSON 

"Eddy" 
What's the difference? 
Radio (b) 
The Ocean (c) 
Radio operator (d) 



(a) 



PAULINE R. WESTON 

"Polly," "Pal" 
If it isn't it should be (a) 
Chipie, Clothes and Children (b) 
Where ever he takes me! (c) 
To get there (d) 
Red Cross, Bowling, 1, 2; Senior 

Play Com., Dram. Club (e) 



CONSTANCE B. WHITTEN 

"Connie" 
Quite (a) 
Acting (b) 

Some business office (c) 
The New York Stage (d) 
Tennis, 2 ; Archery, 2 ; Dram. 
Club, Dram. Club Play, Com- 
mercial Club, 3 (e) 



ETHEL M. WINGATE 

"Eff" 
So help me (a) 
Picking daisies (b) 
I wish I knew (c) 
To find bigger and better daisies 

(d) 
Bowling, 1, 3; Baseball, 1, 3; 

Basketball, 3; Volley Ball, 3; 

Archery, 3 (e) 




VIRGINIA C. WARREN 
Ginnie" 

Oh, my! (a) 

Diving, Dancing, Asking Helen 
foolish questions (b) 

Upper Darby (c) 

To beat Ernie eating icecream(d) 

Jr. Prom. Com., Sr. Dance Com., 
Sr. Play Com., Sec. Com. Club, 
3; Dram. Club, 2, 3; Basket- 
ball, 3; Bowling, 1, 2, 3; Arch- 
ery, 3 ; Tennis, 3 ; Honor Roll, 
3; Basketball, 3 (e) 



CARL ALLEN WEEKS 

"Sissy" 
Get smart (a) 

Golf, Swimming, Baseball (b) 
Los Angeles, Honolulu (c) 
To break "100" playing golf (d) 
Unknown (e) 



MARGUERITE D. WHITFORD 
"Rete" 

That's all there is ; there isn't any 
more (a) 

Philately and Reading my Broth- 
er's mail (b) 

Who knows? (c) 

To paper a room with postage 
stamps (d) 

Commercial Club, 3; Basketball, 
1 ; Bowling, 3 (e) 



CORINNE WIDTFELDT 

"Widdy" 

I'll give ya ten guesses (a) 

Correcting other people's Eng- 
lish (b) 

Around the next bend in the 
road (c) 

To see what's there (d) 

Dramatic Club (e) 



JEANNETTE LUCILLE WOLF 

"Janet," "Woofie" 
What'U we do (a) 
Writing Poetry (b) 
Time will tell (c) 
To be a Laboratory Technician 

(d) 

Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Or- 
chestra, 1 (e) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIRROR, 19 3 5 



RUTH L. COGSWELL 

"You guess" 
Haven't any (a) 
Kidding B. G. (b) 
Who can tell? (c) 
To see the year 2000 (d) 
Archery, 3 ; Dram. Club, 



4 (e) 



ELEANORE ELDRIDGE 

"Duchess" 
It doesn't bother me (a) 
Horses, Golf, Knitting (b) 
Finishing school (c) 
Buyer of ladies' clothes (d) 
Dramatic Club, Soph-Sr., Chair- 
man Candy Girls, Dram Club 
Play Sr. year; Senior Play Cast, 
3; Christmas Carols, 1, 2, 3 
(e) 



JOHN J. HEALEY 

"Johnny" 
Wake up and die right (a) 
Golf (b) 
Any place (c) 
To get there (d) 



LLOYD VICTOR SEESTED 

"Vic" 
Hi kid (a) 
Sports (b) 
College (c) 

To become a Military Pilot (d) 
Footba'l, 2, 3; Hockey, 1, 2, 3; 

Baseball, 2, 3; Golf, 2, 3 (e) 




LOUIS F. STINEHOUR 

"Lou," "Bunny" 
You said it (a) 
Talking to Tiger (b) 
Brother-in-law's farm (c) 
Be a dictator (d) 
Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Football, 1, 2; 

Basketball, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



EVELYN M. SULMONETTI 

"Skippy" 
Really (a) 

Collecting Souvenirs (b) 
Metropolitan Opera Co. (c) 
Concert Singer (d) 
Orchestra, 1; Dram. Club, 1, 2, 

3; Senior Class Play, 3 (e) 



BERTHA MAY THOMAS 

"Bud" 
Where would you get fifty men ? 

(a) 
Scrapbook and Stamp Collecting, 

Running races with the 8.00 

bell (b) 
Art School (c) 
To be an Interior Decorator (d) 



ELIZABETH WYMAN 

"Betty," "Robert" 
Phooey (a) 

Drawing, Reading Esquire (b) 
Where do all the nuts end up? 

(c) 
Caesar and Macbeth taught me a 

lesson (d) 
Mirror, Senior Play, Honor Roll 

(e) 



Note: {a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby 
(c) Destination, (d) Ambition, ye) Activities 




ROBERT YAMARTINO 

"Yame," "Rabbi," "Bob" 
Hey Bud — Whata you got? (a) 
Keeping warm all winter at 

Burlesque Shows (b) 
As far as Mae West's house (c) 
To own a Tailor Shop (d) 
Basketball (e) 



JOSEPH A. ADSHADE 

"Spooks," "Joe" 
Have a good time (b) 
Edison Electric Light Co. (c) 
Auto work (d) 

RICHARD F. BAIRD 

"Dick" 
Pip pip (a) 
Orchestras, Cars (b) 
Quien Sab (c) 
Designer, Pilot (d) 
Dramatic Club, 3 ; Track, 3 ; 

Senior Club Play (e) 

MYRTLE E. BARBARICK 

"Bunny" 
Really (a) 
Dancing (b) 

Mass. General Hospilal (c) 
Nurse (d) 

EDITH CAFARELLA 

JAMES JOSEFH CONNOLLY 

"Shamus" 
I'll smash you (a) 
Sports and Art (b) 
Art School (c) 

To be a professional athlete (d) 
Vice Pres.; Football, 1, 2, 3; 

Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 

1, 2, 3; Track, 1, 2, 3; Senior 

Dance Com. (e) 

EDWARD B. CUNNINGHAM 

"Butch" 
You-ser (a) 
Baseball (b) 

Harvard Law School (c) 
Professional Baseball player (d) 
Baseball, 3 (e) 

ROBERT S. CUNNINGHAM 

"Bob" 
Oh Yeah! (a) 

Moochin' ice cream at recess (b) 
U. of Alcatraz (c) 
Captain of the U of A cross 

country track team (d) 
Football, 1, 2, 3 (e) 

LEONARD THOMAS CURRAN 
Band, 1, 2, 3; Golf, 3, 4; Bas- 
ketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball, 1, 
2; Dramatic Club, 4 (e) 

BERNARD R. DOE 

"Bennie" 
Cut the royal (a) 
Throwing the bull (b) 
South Sea Islands (d) 
Be a printer (d) 

RONALD B. DORRINGTON 

"Tubby" 
(Censored) (a) 
Pop corn (b) 
Home (c) 
Grease monkey (d) 



THE MIRROR, 1935 

LOUIS JOHN GIARDINA 
"Louie" 

Shut up (a) 
Aviation (b) 
Who knows (c) 



THOMAS J. GIARDINA 

"Blackie" 
I'll break ya armb off (a) 
Horses, Automobiles (b) 
New York (c) 
To see every state in North 

America (d) 
Football, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 

2, 3 (e) 



WILLIAM L. HEATH 

"Bill" 
That'll be the day (a) 
Crossword puzzles (b) 
West Point (c) 
To be President (d) 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



LOWELL H. HENRY 

"Tarzan," "Tizy" 
That's your story (a) 
Drawing (b) 
United States Marines (c) 
To be a master of Trumpet (d) 
Band, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 3 (e) 



LAWRENCE PAUL IODICE 
"Ikey," "Larry," "Slugger" 
Mac would still use three! (a) 
Trying to be nice to Ducky (b) 
Fenway Park and California. See 

the world (c) 
Just to be a success in life (d) 
Basketball 2, 3; Baseball, 3, 4 
(e) 



GORDON W. KING 

"Crooner" 
H'lo (a) 
Girls (b) 
Poorhouse (c) 
To be a good archer (d) 

JOSEPH FRANK LENTINI 

"Peno" 
Aw rats (a) 
Collecting Stamps, Playing Pool 

(b) 
Bemis Tech (c) 
To see the world (d) 

SOBHY E. MABARDY 

"Soupy" 
You sed it (a) 
Baseball (b) 
In a garage (c) 
Aviation (d) 
Student Council 1 year (e) 



JOSEPH THOMAS MANDILE 

"Mandy" 
What's the matter (a) 
Pool, taking cars apart (b) 
Around the world (c) 
To become a good soldier (d) 
Drawing (e) 



HARRY W. MANUEL 

"Bugs" 
It just shows to go yer (a) 
Collecting neckties (b) 
Boston Globe (c) 
To be a Linotyper (d) 
Intermural Basketball, '32, '33, 

'34 (e) 



EDWARD JOHN MARSHALL 

"Eddie" 
That'll be the day (a) 
Dancing (b) 

Glen Gray's Casa Loma (c) 
Musician (d) 
Student Council 1 year; Band 3 

years (e) 



ANNE McNAMARA 
Dancing, Sports, Collecting nick- 
nacks (b) 
To enjoy life and become suc- 
cessful (c) 
Time will tell (d) 
Volley Ball, 3, 4; Archery, 3, 
4; Baseball, 4; Tennis, 4 (e) 



GEORGE A. MORRISON 
"Buddy" 

Hey, Stupid; Annastatia (a) 

Golf, Cartooning, Meeting An- 
nastatia (b) 

National Amateur Open Tourna- 
ment (c) 

To be a professional golfer and 
general of the Soldiers of For- 
tune (d) 

Plenty, but it's a secret (e) 



BASIL R. PATTERSHALL 

"Ric," "Pattershall" 
Sleeping (b) 
Germany (c) 

To be another Weismuller (d) 
Swimming for Y. M. C. A. (e) 



THEODORE PHELAN 

"Ted" 
Ah! them fish (a) 
Is fishing a sport? (b) 
Canada (c) 
Canadian printer (d) 
Varsity Basketball, 2, 3 (e) 



Note: (a) Favorite Expression, (b) Hobby, (c) Destination, (d) Ambition, (e) Activities 



THE MIRROR 



19 3 5 



EDITH MARGERY PINEO 
"Dee," "Pineo" 

Okey Dolce (a) 

Horses and Sheep Dogs and 
Schubert Music (b) 

Maynard, Mass., for better or 
for worse (c) 

To sing (d) 

Graduation Day Exercises, Asso- 
ciate Member of Commercial 
Club, Junior yr., Honor Roll, 
Commercial Club (e) 

PHILIP IRVINS RHODES 

"Phil" 
Get smart (a) 
Aviation (b) 
Honolulu (c) 
Aviator (d) 

SEBASTIAN A. RIGOLI 
"Bus" 

How's things (a) 

Golf (b) 

New York (c) 

Doctor (d) 

Football, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2; 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Commercial 
Club, Track, 1, 2, 3 (e) 



JAMES ROBERTSON 

"Shadow" 
Therefore what? (a) 
Chasing fires (b) 
State House (c) 
To become State Fire Marshal 

(d) 
Manager of Basketball, Student 

Council (e) 



FRANCES M. SAVAGE 

"Franie" 
Hi Doopy (a) 
Vocalizing at any baseball game 

(b) 
Desert Island with Tarjan (c) 
To grow up and be a lady (d) 
Monitor, Baseball, Volley Ball 

Class Team (e) 



HERMAN I. STROUM 

"Herme" 
College of Hark Knocks (c) 
Caesar was ambitious, Look what 

he got! (d) 
Football, 1, 2; Track, 2 (e) 



LOUISE C. TENANTY 
"Siddy," "Leny" 

Did you really? (a) 

Tennis (b) 

A hundred miles from Waltham 
(c) 

To travel (d) 

Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Field Hock- 
ey, Volley Ball, Bowling, Arch- 
ery, Red Cross, Dram. Club, 
Commercial Club (e) 



GEORGE C. THORSEN 

"Jigger," "Swede" 
So what? (a) 

Sports, Fool around cars (b) 
Retire (c) 
Tool maker (d) 



GEORGE ALBERT VENTI 

Machine (b) 

Take it easy (c) 

Work (d) 

Student Council 2 years (e) 



THE MIRROR, 1935 



'V 



Class History 



Day was dawning as a plump infant opened its 
eyes, gazed in wonder at its surroundings, and 
forthwith announced its arrival to the world. It 
observed certain forms hovering about, which 
gradually assumed more definite shape. Curious 
eyes peered at it. It was at intervals conscious of 
experimental pokes and prods. It was aware of 
great confusion, a medley of strange sounds, and 
much rushing about. 

Days passed and it increased in vigor and 
powers of perception. It was able to perceive 
that the strange shapes which surrounded it were 
divided into two groups. First there was a group 
of miscellaneous older persons, some of whom 
uttered gutteral sounds and wore a curious fringe 
around their mouths, and others of whom spoke 
with higher-pitched voices. This group it was 
able to identify as its nurses, who, with great 
regularity, bathed and weighed it, took it out for 
airing, and with much patience attempted to feed 
it, chiding it sometimes gently and sometimes not 
so gently when it seemed to have no appetite. 
The other group appeared to consist of two indi- 
viduals, both larger than itself, and one consid- 
erably larger than the other. These, who were 
also under the care of the first group, showed 
much more independence. They paid compara- 
tively little attention to their nurses, and wholly 
ignored the infant itself except to tease it. 

Soon it became able to walk; and at first halt- 
ingly, then with more assurance, began to talk. 
It realized that its nurses were called teachers, 
that the two individuals were its older brothers, 
known as Junior and Senior, and also that its own 
name was Sophomore — a name which to Junior 
and Senior appeared to be more or less a joke. 
Consequently, the child soon came to learn that 
in the presence of its older brothers it should as- 
sume an attitude of humility and deference. 
Nevertheless, as it grew older and associated more 
with them, it found their companionship not al- 
together unpleasant. 

During its early childhood it came under the 
influence of guiding spirits named Mallard Kil- 



gore, Paul Butman, Kenneth Stone, and Richard 
Blake. These spirits assisted greatly in suggesting 
forms of social recreation, but did not receive 
much encouragement. Sophomore endeavored to 
play football and hockey, and, although not al- 
ways successful, greatly enjoyed the sports. At 
baseball and field hockey the child at least held 
its own. Even though it did not locally distin- 
guish itself, it gained national prominence when 
it journeyed to the World's Fair at Chicago and 
won first honors in band competition. 

But all infants need rest, so the child was given 
a vacation from which it returned much older and 
bolder. During this vacation many changes had 
taken place. Its older brother had gone to make 
his way in the world, and there was a new little 
brother, whom it examined curiously, and with 
whom, remembering the conduct of its brothers 
the year before, it adopted an air of superiority. 
Because Senior had gone, Junior moved up to take 
his name and place, and consequently, since the 
child was now the second oldest in the family, it 
was called Junior, while the new baby was given 
the discarded name of Sophomore. Junior had 
grown so much older and stronger that this year 
he had greater success in athletics, losing only one 
football game and playing in the semi-finals of 
hockey. His new guiding spirits, Ptolemy Adams, 
Adelyn Fish, Marion Nickerson, and Ernest 
Schwotzer tried to interest him anew in a social. 
But Junior appeared annoyed because he could 
stay up no later than ten-thirty o'clock, and would 
have nothing to do with the affair. A little later, 
however, he enthusiastically supported a dance 
given in honor of Senior, known as the Junior 
Prom. This was held at Nuttings, and Junior, 
with Ernest Schwotzer as his chairman, made it a 
huge success. At this time, after much delibera- 
tion, he decided that his favorite colors were blue 
and silver, and with a show of bravado adopted 
as his motto, Quid nunc? (What now?) 

But now brother Senior began to try his wings 
and to prepare to fly the parental nest. Junior, 
looking forward to taking Senior's place, revealed 



THE MIRROR, 1935 



his literary powers by helping to publish Senior's 
picture and biography in the Mirror. 

Although he welcomed another vacation, he felt 
that he was now too big to need rest. Neverthe- 
less, he accepted a few weeks of freedom, sus- 
pecting that his teachers, too, would benefit by a 
summer of relaxation. 

Again on his return from vacation the custom- 
ary shifting of names took place, and he at last 
succeeded to the coveted title of Senior. Another 
set of guiding spirits, Ernest Schwotzer, James 
Connolly, Marion Nickerson, and Theodore Sum- 
ner capably managed his increasingly busy affairs. 
As he regarded himself in the Mirror, it seemed 
that he was beginning to fulfill the promise of his 
earlier years. He was a most athletic young man, 
successfully playing football and hockey with 
Roland Anderson and Henry Collins as his cap- 
tains. This year he added as important sports to 
his schedule, archery and volleyball. Turning his 
attention to acting, he distinguished himself in 
the Dramatic Club production, "Caught Wet". 
Shortly after this event, he gave the Senior Dance, 
choosing Robert Fitzgerald as the chairman. 

But, alas, his countenance began to show signs 
of redness and speckles, which could not be due 
to sunburn in this season of the year. Also, 
bumps began to form behind his ears, which might 
reasonably have been attributed to a swelled head, 
but a diagnosis of which promptly dispelled any 
such conclusion. For the doctor pronounced the 
doom which obliged Senior to step down from his 
pedestal and endure the ridicule and laughter of 
his brothers. He had the German measles! For 
weeks thereafter teachers regarded each other sus- 
piciously, ran their fingers under their collars in 
terror, and carefully avoided any persons showing 
even a sign of a spot. 

Feeling the need of recovering the prestige lost 
during the measles epidemic, Senior again proved 
his dramatic ability in the Senior Play, "Big- 
Hearted Herbert," with Paul Butman as chair- 
man. The success of the play, besides bringing up 
the Senior stock, increased his bankroll, which 



had begun to feel the strain of the expenses of 
such a man of the world. He could now afford 
Class Day, and Ernest Schwotzer was chosen 
chairman of this event. 

Senior had never had a picture taken except 
for the yearly photographs used for identification 
purposes — that assortment of caricatures resem- 
bling passport pictures which one's own mother 
would not recognize. He chose Robert Fitzgerald 
as chairman of a committee to interview various 
Boston photographers. After more or less waver- 
ing, deliberation, and politics, Senior made his 
choice of photographers and had his picture taken 
for the Mirror. 

The Mirror was a publication in which he took 
pardonable pride. Three editions were published 
during the year under the capable guidance of 
Richard Blake as editor-in-chief and Paul Butman 
as business manager. The three brothers com- 
prising the school family had so increased in size 
that an enlargement of the building had long been 
necessary. At one time rumors flew that a new 
school would be built in some swamp or other 
distant site, but one morning, to everyone's sur- 
prise, steam shovels appeared on both sides of the 
old building and began digging the cellar for 
new wings. When told that the addition would 
not be finished in time for him to use them. 
Senior consoled himself with the thought that at 
least the crowded condition of the old building 
had kept him in closer contact with his fellows. 

As befits one approaching man's estate, Senior 
chose Richard Blake to write his will and Franklin 
Davis his prophecy. 

As he looked back over the period of his growth 
from childhood to maturity, it seemed that life 
had just begun. He realized how appropriate 
were his chosen, colors and motto. Before him 
stretched a future of blue skies. Clouds, of 
course, would appear, but all would have silver 
linings. He could face the world with a smile 
and the query, "Quid nunc?" 

Priscilla Davis. 



THE MIBBOB, 1935 



Class Will 



Be it Remembered: 

That we, the Class of 1935, being of sound 
mind — that is, as sound as can reasonably be 
expected after three long years of mental torture, 
during which time we have been battered with 
text books, and our heads crammed with intellect- 
ual stuffing — and fully realizing that we are soon 
to be hurled unmercifully from the protecting 
portals of Waltham's famous Institute of Learn- 
ing, and that we shall disintegrate as a body and 
pass as individuals into an unknown realm, we, 
therefore, in a spirit of forgiveness to those who 
have been so instrumental in trying to add a few 
extra convolutions to the grey contents of our 
ivory domes, do hereby devise and bequeath a few 
valuable possessions. 

To the Class of 1936 we leave our version of 
"How the Ideal Senior Should Act," and modestly 
remind them that it is because of our saintly con- 
duct that W. H. S. is now sprouting wings. 

When these wings have fully developed, it is 
our will that they be used to shelter the new 
brood of Sophomores, and protect them from the 
wiles of alluring Seniors. 

To Mr. Burke, our kind and sympathetic foster- 
father, we bequeath our most precious gift, our 
heartfelt thanks and gratitude for his paternal 
guidance. 

To Mr. Goodrich, our submaster and master 
mind, we leave an unabridged edition of "The 
Brainy Boys' Famous Excuses", so that he will be 
prepared for the tall stories of future schemers. 

To Mr. Ward, who has prepared us with truth 
and wisdom for the Journey of Life, we present 
a ticket to Hollywood as a reward for his untir- 
ing efforts. Mae the trip West be enjoyable and 
delightful. 

We authorize and empower our executors here- 
inafter named to purchase a turnstile to be placed 
at the rear door of Room 9. We sincerely hope 
that it will aid Mademoiselle Clement to check 
the mad exit of the "thundering herd" at 12:45. 



To Mr. Hollis we leave a talking robot which 
will automatically say, "Quiet, please!" when he 
is annoyed by the superfluous talk of proverbial 
wisecrackers. 

The General Course bequeaths to Miss Allen 
a carton of session cards and a gallon of ink, for 
they feel sure that she will need them if next 
year's class persists in carrying on the traditional 
antics of their predecessors. 

To Fraulein Hoffman we give our thanks for 
the amusing German anecdotes which made the 
language interesting, and to the future German 
classes we leave a gilt edged volume, "Who's Who 
in the Hoffman Family Tree," so that they may 
read in detail about "der Deutsche Franzosische 
Grossvater und die Stiefgrossmutter." 

By special permission of the copyright owners, 
we dedicate the song "Only a Rose I Give You" 
to Mr. Hodge, and if he learns to sing "You're 
the Apple of My Eye" proficiently, a bushel of 
apples shall also be his. 

We do hereby revoke all wills and codicils here- 
tofore made by us, and do nominate, constitute 
and appoint Miss Rigby and Mr. Lees, our trust- 
worthy legal advisors, as executors of this our 
last will and testament. 

Because we know the inheritance tax will be 
so large that nothing will remain of our estate, 
we leave an untaxable and hearty "Hurrah" for 
dear old Waltham High, its faculty, and its in- 
mates. 

In witness whereof, we the above named testa- 
tor, have set our sign and seal this fifth day of 
June, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine 
hundred and thirty-five, and of the New Order, 
the third. 



We, the class of '35, do make this codicil to 
our will, and hereby appoint Miss Louise Hatch 
to assist in presenting the gifts to those, who by 



T HE MIRROR, 19 3 5 



thoughtful consideration and vote have been 
deemed worthy of beneficence. 

That his popularity may never wane, we give 
to Ernie Schwotzer a Duesenberg convertible road- 
ster. We hope he can find a willing chauffeur so 
that he may, himself, enjoy the rumble seat. 

To the charming Miss who was voted the most 
popular, we present this package. We hope 
Marion will not be too busily engaged to keep 
these extra dates. 

What could be better than a set of curlers for 
the good-looking chap, Kenneth Stone? Now he 
will be able to preserve the systematic kinks in 
his hair during noctural slumbers. 

To a studious one who must labor into the wee 
hours of the morning, we give this kerosene lamp 
Our forefathers used whale oil lamps, but — there's 
nothing "Fishie" about this one. As one who 
will also be most likely to succeed, Adelyn, we 
hand you the world, that you may conquer where 
you will. 

It's no secret that for our class belle cupid has 
shot many arrows, so to you, Miss Nyman, we 
leave a string of bows (beaux) . 

To Mai, the best actor of the class, we donate 
this most expressive mask, complete with side- 
whiskers, beard, and what have you. We are so 
sure that he will become a success in Hollywood 
in characterizing great people of history, while 
still very young, that we should like to overcome 
for him the difficulty of being too young to grow 
this hirsute appendage. 

To our modern Beau Brummel, Ptolemy Adams, 
we leave a cane, monocle, and silk topper. It is 
our desire that he don these accessories when he 
poses as the Seniors' edition of the well dressed 
man. 

To Elinor, our model of fashion, we present a 
chapeau of wonderful creation, but we hope it 
will not inspire her to high-hat her friends. 



To Baby Bugs we bequeath a bonnet with many 
frills upon it. He'll be the grandest kiddo in the 

baby parade. 

Harriet Sawyer is to receive a pair of boxing 
gloves, so that she may try a hand at her one and 
only unconquered sport. 

To Mickey McMullen we award a silver cup 
for his outstanding achievements in our school 
athletics. 

To our happy maid, Edith Pierce, we bequeath 
a sun suit, so that she may absorb a bountiful 
supply of sunshine to radiate cheer along the 
path of life. 

To protect our cheerful Horace from storms 
which might dampen his spirit, we leave to him 
an umbrella, trusting, though, that he may never 
have an occasion to use it. 

To Priscilla D., the shining light of our social 
life, we present a "flash", so that even in darkness 
her brilliance will ever shine. 

Remembering the adage, "Monkey see, monkey 
do," we give to Jimmy Cannistraro, who has per- 
formed so well as our class clown, a pet animal. 
We think that he will learn from it a few more 
monkeyshines. 

To Harold Pope, especially devoted to the ac- 
quisition of knowledge, we present "A" souvenir 
of his intellectual achievements. 

To Bad Man Lenny, who has spent much time 
cutting up, we will a sewing kit to aid him to 
mend his ways. 

To the actress of great ability we present a star 
and may its guidance lead her to the height of its 
distinction behind the footlights of Broadway. 

And last, but not least, we bequeath to Richard, 
our boy most likely to succeed, this key to success. 
May it always turn his way. 

In testimony whereof, we, the graduating Class 
of 1935, Waltham, Massachusetts, do affix our 
sign and seal, and hereby declare and publish this 
our last will and codicil. 

Richard Blake. 



THE MIRROR, 19 3 5 
CLASS MOTTO 

QUID NUNC? WHAT NOW? 



We are leaving the shelter of our school to 
face life in all its realities. We pause to ask 
"What now, whither are we going, and what 
awaits us?" Our childhood days are over, and 
we must take upon ourselves many new responsi- 
bilities. As we reflect on the past, we come to 
full realization and appreciation of the good for- 
tune that has been ours. We have had the loving 
care and guidance of our parents who have led 
us along pleasant paths, and the great advantage 
of the free public schools that have given us 
education and training, the best preparation for 
the perplexities of life which we shall meet at 
every turn. Our teachers have been ever ready to 
assist us to make the most of this golden oppor- 
tunity, and it is with great appreciation and 
gratitude that we extend to them our thanks for 
their kindness and help. 

"What now?" is the question which confronts 
us as we start out. We are entering a world where 



we shall have to compete with those tried in the 
hard school of experience, and from that same 
teacher shall we also learn. Our youthful dreams 
will fade; we must take the hard knocks with the 
rest, sometimes growing faint, but we must press 
on with courage and forge ahead seeking the door 
of opportunity, which in these troublesome times 
will be difficult to find. None of these things shall 
daunt us; we will not let the dark clouds of pessi- 
mism overshadow our optimism. With new ideas, 
new enthusiasm, we go out into the world to con- 
quer — in spite of difficulties. As we accomplish 
each new task set before us, we shall question, 
"What now?" and turn to make a greater effort. 
There will always be fertile fields to be explored 
by those who have the ambition to succeed. So 
we shall answer the question "What now?" by 
saying, "WE will make good!" 

Richard Blake. 



Who's Who in the Class of 1935 



Most Popular Boy 

Most Popular Girl 

Best Looking Boy 

Best Looking Girl 

Most Studious Boy 

Most Studious Girl 

Best Actor 

Best Actress 

Most Cheerful Boy 

Most Cheerful Girl 

Best Dressed Boy 

Best Dressed Girl 

Class Bad Man 

Class Baby 

Most Athletic Boy 

Most Athletic Girl 

Brightest Social Light 

Class Clown 

Girl Most Likely to Succeed 

Boy Most Likely to Succeed 



Ernest Schwotzer 

Marion Nickerson 

Kenneth Stone 

Helen Nyman 

Harold Pope 

Adelyn Fish 

Mallard Kilgore 

Harriet Childs 

Horace Smith 

Edith Pierce 

Ptolemy Adams 

Elinor Olson 

Leonard Curran 

Alexander Bergstrom 

Henry McMullen 

Harriet Sawyer 

Priscilla Davis 

James Cannistraro 

Adelyn Fish 

Richard Blake 



THE MIEKOE, 1 5) 3 5 



Tercentenary Thoughts 



Nineteen hundred and thirty-five not only marks 
the year of our graduation, but it also celebrates 
the 300th Anniversary of the American High 
School. This anniversary is a milestone along 
the road of American education. It recalls a past 
full of trials, obstacles, and sacrifices. In com- 
paring the past with the accomplishments of the 
present, this milestone helps us to predict a fu- 
ture of education which may surpass our greatest 
dreams. In this way, the Tercentenary celebration 
causes us to think seriously of the past, present, 
and future of the American public secondary 
education. 

The first successful steps in education were 
taken in Boston. In 1635 the citizens of Boston, 
wishing to insure a learned ministry, requested, 
in one of their first town meetings, Philemon Por- 
mont "to become scholemaster for the teaching 
and nourtering of the children with us." This 
was the founding of the Boston Latin School, then 
located in the yard of King's Chapel. This school 
was attended by the Adams brothers and John 
Hancock. In 1647 Massachusetts ordered every 
town of more than one hundred families to have 
a grammar school. After the Revolutionary War, 
a number of academies were established, and in 
1821 the first high school, the Boston English 
High School, was founded. This brief history 
of the first high schools shows the truth of the 
statement of John Adams, "The public institu- 
tions in New England for the education of the 
youth are not equaled, and never were, in any 
part of the world." 

With the same pride with which we recall our 
early New England schools, we observe our great 
improvement in education after three hundred 
years. The cruel tyranny of the master's rod has 
been replaced by discipline through understanding 



and friendly guidance. Girls are given the same 
opportunities in education as are boys. The one- 
room cabin school has become the beautiful high 
school with its halls, lunch counters, gymnasia, 
libraries, and laboratories. Some of these ad- 
vantages we have in the Waltham High School. 
In addition we have the privilege of taking part in 
literary, athletic, social, and dramatic activities. 
Best of all we receive the education and influence 
of a most excellent group of teachers. I use the 
Waltham High School as an example, for I feel 
it well represents the finest of modern high 
schools. 

With such progress we can expect a great fu- 
ture for the secondary school. The future high 
school will have to face many problems. It must 
realize that a frightful number of students learn 
to be dishonest in high school. The students 
should be prepared to meet such temptations by 
convincing, friendly talks on morality given by 
the high school. There should be access for the 
individual student to much wise, friendly advice. 
There should be a democratic spirit among the 
students. The students of the future should be 
allowed to pursue their studies at a speed suitable 
to the individual. The welfare of the youth of to- 
morrow should not suffer for economical measures. 
These are merely a few of the many thoughts con- 
cerning the future of the high school, the high 
school whose welfare and advancements we, the 
graduates, shall endeavor to promote. 

Therefore, in celebrating the 300th anniversary 
of the American secondary school, let us recall 
with admiration the progress made in education 
since 1635, let us be thankful for our excellent 
education to-day, and let us resolve to protect the 
welfare of the high school of to-morrow. 

Dagmar Bistrup. 



THE MIEEOR, 1935 



Class Prophecy 



When Helen Nyman, the greatest movie star 
the world has ever known, mentioned to her em- 
ployer, Sumner Peterson, head of Utopia Pictures, 
Inc., that when she married Kenneth Stone, the 
internationally famous polo player, she wanted to 
have a quiet wedding, Sumner put his foot down 
emphatically. 

"No," he cried, "you are the greatest movie 
star that ever was ; therefore you must have a wed- 
ding befitting such a great person. You will be 
married next month, on New Year's Day, 1946, in 
the Rose Bowl, Los Angeles, and the whole world 
shall have an opportunity to attend." 

Miss Nyman made her phenomenal rise to 
fame and fortune in only three pictures. Her 
first was a short one, entitled "When Father Came 
Home," in three reels, in which she was featured 
with Enoch Studley. Utopia Pictures discovered 
her in that film, and they starred her in "The 
Ashman's Daughter," based on Harold Pope's 
play of that name. Following that, she endeared 
herself to every man, woman, and child in the 
United States and Europe in "Sadie, Sweetheart 
of the Slums," which was written especially for 
her by Harriet Childs. Thus, it was only natural 
that the population should receive the news of her 
public wedding with considerable rejoicing, and 
that as long as the daily papers filled their front 
pages with the details of her career and life, they 
should be read avidly. 

Some people, however, were displeased. Al- 
phonse Varriale, in his column "Dirt from under 
the Carpet, which appears in the seven hundred 
newspapers of the Blake Syndicate, was rather cyn- 
ical. He wrote "Don't fall too hard for all this 
stuff about Helen Nyman's wedding. She's been 
married seven times: to Donald Lawson, Phil 
Barry, Rudolph Helgeson, Harold Bowley, Gustave 
Geisler, John Collins, and Manley Boyce in that 
order. Stone has also taken the plunge seven 
times, to Virginia Warren, Bernice Peterson, Mary 
Owens, Pauline Weston, Virginia Cobb, Alma 
Lundgren, and Florence Crevoshay respectively. 
So, you see, it's nothing new for them." 



Richard Daly and Marian Nickerson, principals 
in the sensational Daly-Nickerson divorce case, to- 
gether with their attorneys, Harriet Goodwin and 
Betty Buckley, and Priscilla Davis, the judge, all 
were angry because the publicity given to the 
wedding had relegated them to the inside pages 
of the newspapers. 

The jury in the Fabrizio-Mega murder trial, 
which consisted of Kline Dreppard, Francis Cun- 
nare, Walter Luke, Stephen Juskin, Richard Jen- 
sen, Joseph Mandile, Norman O'Claire, George 
Orpin, Richard Jones, Gerald McCaul, Thomas 
Rooney, and Tony Sogliero were considerably net- 
tled, because now that they were no longer front 
page news, having been displaced by the space 
given the wedding, Robert Buckley, head of the 
Buckley Theatrical Circuit, had withdrawn his 
offer of a stage career for them and their respective 
wives: Agnes Lyon, Vera Smith, Stephanie Krol, 
Bessie Pike, Louise Tenanty, Marguerite Whitford, 
Rosalie Tracy, Elizabeth Ohnemus, Juliette 
Flueckiger, Olive Cox, Helen Coffin, and Ruth 
Bearsto. 

As New Year's Day approached, and the news- 
papers continued to fill their columns with news 
of the coming wedding, more and more people 
packed their luggage, headed for California. 
It was the biggest exodus since the Gold Rush in 
1849, and it boomed transportation sky high. 
Ptolemy Adams, head of Cross Country Trans- 
portation Corp. wore a rapturous expression when- 
ever he thought of the hundreds of thousands of 
people using his buses and trains, and Richard 
Baird, president of Baird Airlines, was consider- 
ably pleased because he had had to buy 400 extra 
Ford tri-motored airplanes to take care of the 
rush. 

So great was the flow of people coming into 
Los Angeles by bus, train, automobile, and air- 
plane, that the Rhodes-Pattershall portable houses 
sold like hot cakes; Leonard Curran, Chief of 
Police in Los Angeles, averted a serious crisis 
when he roped off the Sierra Madeira Desert for 



T HE MIRK R , 1 9 3 5 



a parking space. Leonard had risen to that im- 
portant position because he had been a law abid- 
ing citizen all his life. 

Although the wedding was to start at twelve 
noon on New Year's Day, every seat in the house, 
except the reserved section, was occupied a whole 
day ahead of time. The total attendance was es- 
timated at 850,000 people, Utopia Pictures having 
commissioned the Smith-Spaulding Construction 
Co. to erect special bleachers to care for the extra 
attendance. 

I gained my seat about eleven o'clock on the 
morning of the wedding, up on the top row of 
the Rose Bowl, right next to the special booth 
erected by the Quinn Broadcasting Co., to send 
the details of the wedding to the far corners of 
the earth. Inside the booth I could see Mallard 
Kilgore, the announcer, talking rapidly before 
several microphones, while Charles Hirtle, his as- 
sistant, slipped him scribbled notes. As a filler-in, 
while waiting for the wedding party to appear, 
they presented the famous Lakeview Hill Billies, 
by courtesy of Casey Coffins for Contented 
Corpses, singing a novelty number called "She 
Was Only a Coal Heaver's Daughter, but She Was 
Nobody's Fuel," composed by Powers and Phelan. 
I recognized the singers as Edward Christie, Louis 
Stinehour, George McAlpine, Bernard Doe, James 
Walsh, and Edward Cunningham. 

I had thoughtfully provided myself with a 
powerful pair of Butman Binoculars, an early ef- 
fort of that distinguished inventor, Paul Butman, 
and with these I could distinguish a number of 
my former classmates in the vast crowd around me. 
Down on the space where the wedding was to take 
place, I could see Vincent Defina, head usher, 
and his squad of helpers, among whom I recog- 
nized William Bain, Lawrence Iodice, Gordon 
King, Victor Seested, Ralph Alvares, Robert 
Franks, Robert Eaton, Morton Canter, Carleton 
Hastings, and Billy Heath — all looking rather un- 
comfortable in cutaway coats and striped trousers. 

A steam calliope flashily finished in white and 
gold, borrowed for the occasion from the Giardina 
Brothers and Boccabella Circus, was to be used 
instead of the usual organ, at the keys I could see 



Alexander Bergstrom, the calliopist, noisily prac- 
ticing an exercise, while his wife, Adelyn Fish, 
turned the pages for him. Alexander had married 
the dream girl of his high-school days; to tell the 
truth, it was largely through her efforts that he 
had attained his present success. 

A great noise drowned out the calliope as the 
Kavanagh German Band, resplendent in their red 
uniforms with gold braid made for them by the 
Carroll Casella Uniform Co. swung down the cin- 
der track bordering the field. Through my binoc- 
ulars I recognized Robert Larcome playing the 
tuba; Joseph Lentini, the clarinet; Charles Fox, 
the trumpet, and Joseph Adshade, the E flat alto 
horn. 

Sweeping the crowd again, I saw the arrival of 
the Boston Bloomer Girls, the only women's foot- 
ball team in the country, together with their own- 
ers, Ernest Schwotzer and Robert Fitzgerald, and 
Henry Collins, the coach. I recognized some of 
the stalwart players as Louise French, Catherine 
Cronin, Myrtle Barbarick, Alice Maguire, Harriet 
Sawyer, Agnes Rolin, Phyllis Shattuck, Catherine 
Delfino, Constance Whitten, Corinne Widtfeldt, 
Barbara Bennett, Eleanor Eldridge, and Joan 
Bogert. The girls had just completed a very suc- 
cessful season, defeating Henry McMullen's Green 
Bay Packers by a score of 48 — to win the cham- 
pionship of the professional football league. 

I saw Dr. James Connolly, founder of the Uni- 
versity of Cultural Arts at Chicago, seated with 
his wife, the former Edna Stromberg, and four of 
his professors: David Scott, Donald Miller, Paul 
Isaacson, and James Robertson. John Powers, 
owner of "Personality Plus," the Kentucky Derby 
winner, was seated between Robert Shaver, his 
jockey, and Horace Smith, creator of the comic 
strip, "The Five Little Pigs and How They 
Grew." Frank Bordenca, winner of the Grand 
International Art Prize, was seated with his wife, 
Barbara Risdon, and Jeanette Wolf, who occupied 
the aching void left in the literary world by the 
death of Gertrude Stein. I noticed the Smith 
Brothers, George and Shaw, the Cough Drop 
Kings, who stood out in any crowd because of 
their knee-length beards. 



THE MIRROR, 1935 



There was a coterie from the Doherty training 
camp on Catalina Island where William Nyman 
was training for his coming battle with Harvey 
Roberts. While William was seated with' his two 
seconds, Allan Weeks and Rinaldo Paladino, all 
three kept glancing about nervously, as though 
expecting to see Harvey, but he was on the far 
side of the Bowl, seated with his three handlers: 
Richard Ellis, John Healey, and Arthur Hansen. 

My attention was attracted by a host of garish 
signs displayed indiscriminately about the edge of 
the track, all proclaiming various commercial 
products, such as "Use Wasson Waterwings," 
"Try Cunningham's Old Drip Tobacco," and 
"Test Terrio Toothbrushes." I was interrupted 
in my perusal of the signs by someone's brushing 
past me to reach his seat. Looking up, I saw that 
it was Leslie Caswell, the gentleman farmer, and 
his wife, the one-time Louise Hatch. Leslie had 
risen to fame when he was presented with a three- 
headed calf, by Annie, the pet cow on his New- 
port estate. 

I watched Augie Palumbo, the drug store mag- 
nate, accompanied by his wife, Gertrude Nelson, 
take his place among a bevy of Fulton Follies 
girls, among whom I recognized Gertrude Con- 
nearney, Louise Huntley, Elinor Olson, Ethel 
Royle, Martha Sangeleer, Pearl Robinson, and 
Edna Kavaleski. James Cannistraro, founder of 
the Panhandler's Union, entered accompanied by 
Florence Ackles, the star in "Flying Dutchman," 
Evelyn Brown's successful musical show. Fol- 
lowing them came Theresa Kilburn, owner of the 
Theresa Beauty Shoppes, with her husband, Lowell 
Henry. 

I interrupted my scanning of the crowd to watch 
the vested choir came in, singing joyfully. As 
they took their places in the choir loft, I recog- 
nized Flora Tibbetts, Ruth Orpin, Doris Shaver, 
and Edith Pineo singing soprano; Mildred Dalla 
Costa, Frances Gordon, Clara Caia, Ethel Hurley, 
and Phyllis Kenney, alto; Fred Tortola, Robert 
Hagen, Daniel Corcoran, and Thomas Eaton, 
tenor; Eugene Grimes, Herman Stroum, Sebastian 
Rigoli, and Wilfred Thorp, baritone; Leo Sange- 
leer, Wesley MacQueen, Roland Anderson, and 
Robert Yamartino, bass. 



At that moment, the uplifted voices of the choir 
were dimmed in a blast from the band, a screech 
from the calliope, and a mighty roar from the 
crowd, as a limousine and a bus, followed by a 
Harrington news reel truck, escorted by six po- 
licemen on heavy Morrison motorcycles, sped twice 
around the track. Focusing the glasses on them, 
I made out the policemen to be Lawrence May, 
Edward Naughton, Clifford Pedersen, Oscar Var- 
riale, Theodore Sumner, and Joseph Trombley. 

The little troupe stopped on the middle of the 
field, when two liveried footmen, Albert Wadding- 
ton and Charles Sanderson, leaped out of the 
limousine to open the doors in order to let Miss 
Nyman, looking very stunning in white, to alight. 
She was escorted by Sumner Peterson, who was 
to give the bride away. From the other door 
stepped the bridegroom and Arthur Walsh, both 
wearing silk hats, cutaway coats, and striped 
trousers. 

The bus, driven by William Pearson, discharged 
its load of ten bridesmaids: Jean Lincoln, Dorothy 
Leishman, Rita Beattie, Ethel Hill, Dorothy Eimer, 
Bessie Bignis, Ruth Hunt, Dorothy Erickson, 
Eleanor Cuniffe, and Marion Gardiner, as well as 
the matron of honor, Evelyn Sulmonetti, whose 
marriage to George Beamish, the lingerie manu- 
facturer, startled New York society. All the 
bridesmaids carried orchids from the Cogswell 
conservatory. 

There was a slight delay in starting the cere- 
mony while Arthur Long and William Nay set up 
their newsreel cameras, but after that was attended 
to, the calliope started to play a new wedding 
march, composed by Hanna Shapiro and Evelyn 
Griff, and the party headed up the field to the 
altar, where Fred Sheffield, the minister clad in 
flowing white robes awaited them. 

The actual wedding took a little longer than 
is usual, because the minister paused to announce 
that the rings came from the Stangby Jewelry Shop, 
New York, Miss Nyman's wedding dress was cre- 
ated by Bistrup, and that her coiffure was designed 
by Bertha Thomas and executed by Annunziata 
Studios. 



THE MIRROR, 1935 



At the conclusion of the ceremony, the couple 
escaped from the milling mob to the waiting cars, 
where they and a few especially invited guests 
were to be taken to a wedding luncheon at the 
home of Vincent Mclnnis, mayor of Los Angeles. 

The crowd on the field so hindered the progress 
of the cars that I had ample time to hitch a ride 
on the rear bumper. Soon I was on my way to 
the magnificent Spanish patio of the mayor, built 
for him by those eminent architects, Leonard and 
Elder. 

There were many people there, but I had no 
difficulty getting inside, where a luncheon had 
been prepared by the chef, Ernest Vienneau, and 
was served by three maids: Betty Wyman, Barbara 
Tracy, and Natalie Reed as the guests were chiefly 
people prominent in the show world, I recog- 
nized a few of them. Some of the members of 
the Moulton Ballet Russe were there: Claire 
Mclntyre, Mabel Barnes, Beatrice Sheer, Virginia 
Stevens, Ethel Wingate, Josephine LoPresti, and 
Betty Shriner. Charles Bryson, the Shakesperean 
actor, was there; Edith Pierce, star of the 20th re- 
vival of the "Vanities;" the radio comedy team 
of Bacon and Hague; Mandell, MacNamara, 
Melanson, and Maurer, the circus acrobats. 

After a great many toasts were drunk to the 
bride and groom, mostly in Tortorella tomato 
juice, the guests adjourned into the next few 
rooms to see the presents. Only the largest and 
the best of the gifts were there; so many had 
come pouring in from all over the world that it 



was necessary to hire a special warehouse to hold 
them all. 

Morris, Morris, and Pope Furniture Co. of 
Seattle had sent a mahogany dining room set; 
Raemusson's of New York a 300-piece solid silver 
dinner service; Girolamo and Sgroi, London 
jewelers, gave a diamond studded grandfather's 
clock; Gordon and Greenwood's of Chicago, a 
gold piano; out in the drive stood the most ex- 
pensive Parker automobile money could buy, sent 
by Elizabeth Leaf, the millionaire sportswoman; 
there was a genuine polar bear cub from that in- 
trepid explorer Ethel Johnson, who was leading 
an expedition to the North Pole, taking with her, 
among others, Bernice Doucette, Bertha Breault, 
Ruth Hathorne, Muriel Cota, Edith Cafarella, 
Marion Patten, Charlotte Parkinson, Doris Har- 
rington, May DeMont, Madeline Chiaccio, and 
Johanna Ristuccia. 

Doore and Dwyer, publishers of Chicago, had 
sent a set of Dickens' first editions; Olsen and 
Savage's department store of San Francisco gave 
a set of fragile china, once used in the White 
House by Dolly Madison. 

There were hundreds of beautiful and expensive 
presents, which required a long time for the 
guests to look over. However, I didn't wait until 
they were through, as I had an early train to catch ; 
but as I left for the station, I decided that I 
wouldn't have missed for anything the chance to 
see the wedding and all my old friends. 

Franklin Davis. 




CLASS DAY COMMITTEE 

Ernest Schwotzer, Chairman 
Louis Stinehour 
Louise Hatch 
Bernice Peterson 
Virginia Warren 
Donald Lawson 



CLASS GIFT COMMITTEE 

Richard Daley 
Barbara Bennett 
Charles Cox 
Dorothy Erickson 
Alphonse Varriale 
Pauline Weston 



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| IT'S NOT TOO LATE ! 

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i to start planning what you are going to do after you grad- 

- uate from High School. College may be one of the possi- 

. bilities, but you might continue the thought further and 

• plan what you want to be doing five years after you are 

| out of High School. 

; Consult your Vocational Director about the various ca- 

TOorc 5nrl tVioiv nnoci Vu'l it ioc Rnoinocc ic r\n o r>f tVio main 



* 



reers and their possibilities. Business is one of the main 
ones, and in times like these a great deal of preparation is 
f necessary before entering it. Yes, a broad education is 
advisable, and then a training for some special phase. 

That's why it's not too early to start planning, and that's 
why we invite you to come in to talk the matter over with 
one of the officers of this school. We would be very glad 
to give you our suggestions as to what courses to take to 

; best prepare for your chosen line of business. If you have 

| no choice we might be able to help you decide. 

' At any rate we hope that it may be convenient for you to 

' come in (we do not employ any outside salesmen or can- 

f vassers) to the school at the corner of Boylston and 

• Arlington Streets, to talk over your plans for the future. 

| Or, write or phone L. 0. White, Principal, Bryant & Strat- 

ton Commercial School, 334 Boylston Street, Boston. 

; ! 

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Burdett Business Training 



Courses for Young Men: Business Administration and Accounting, as 
preparation for sales, credit, financial, office management and 
accounting positions. College grade instruction. 

Open to High School Graduates 

Courses for Young Women: Executive Secretarial, Stenographic Secretarial, 
also Finishing Courses, as preparation for promising secretarial 
positions. Individual advancement. 

Open to High School Graduates 

Courses for Young Men and Young Women: General Business, Book- 
keeping, Shorthand and Typewriting, as preparation for general 
business and office positions. 

Open to High School Graduates 



Previous commercial 
training not required 
for entrance. Many 
leading colleges repre- 
sented in attendance. 



.MfomiuMinii 



Send for 
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F. H. BURDETT. President 

156 STUART STREET, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
TELEPHONE HANCOCK 6300 



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High School Accommodations 

Are Approaching Our Needs 

Compliments of 

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